[last update: 05.26.2020]

Cadillac Styling

 

The Fleetwood
System of Styling Codes

Part 2b

Return to the first part of this Section
or go back to the Styling index page
or view a summary of the Fisher styling codes

 

Here is the remainder of the list of the final two digits of all the Fleetwood styling codes I have come across to date (I had to break up the initial file into two parts as I had complaints that it took forever to download).

Again, to facilitate your research, if you are an enthusiast, like me, of the sixteen-cylinder Cadillac models, entries highlighted in red type indicate that at least one body style with these final digits was built on the V-16 chassis.

Entries in italics denote body styles featured and offered in factory brochures and literature although none are recorded in the Master Parts List as ever having been built.

 

Highlighted in red:  Styles that were built on the sixteen-cylinder Cadillac chassis

 

60 - 69

60 (1) In 1927 style #3260 was a 5-passenger imperial and style #3260S a 5-passenger sedan. In 1928, style #3360 was a 5-passenger imperial. However, these digits soon were used to identify phaeton and sport phaeton styles. Style #8060 was a 7-pass. standard sedan on Series 303 LaSalle in 1928.
60 (2) 1930 V-8 style #3960 and La Salle style #4060 Termed the La Salle Fleetshire phaeton; I have an artist's drawing of another 1930 design, style #4160 [logically a V-16 style but in this case a V-8], 5-passenger sport phaeton, without secondary cowl [Fleetwood sport phaetons generally all had a folding dual cowl and secondary windshield that folded forward, flat against the broad cowl], scalloped hood, front-folding windshield, front opening doors and rear mounted trunk. Other Fleetwood 5-passenger phaetons offered in 1931 were styles #4560 and #4760.


Fleetwood  "Fleetshire", Job #4060 on LaSalle chassis, for 1929-30


The 1930 V-16 style #4260 5-passenger phaeton had a special, wind-down secondary windshield and a very narrow, secondary cowl; 85 of these were built with a base price of $6500, including the special dual-cowl phaeton, style #4260A, described below. At least (and possibly only) one of these cars was fitted out like a sport phaeton with the regular lift-up cowl and folding secondary windshield; formerly owned by Ray and Dorothy Radford of WA state, the car was subsequently acquired and restored by Bob Laravee.

31v64260DrgSml.jpg (23809 bytes)
Special Fleetwood sport phaeton on V-16 chassis
carried the same style number as the regular V-16 phaeton, i.e.  #4260

 

60 (3) 1933 Fleetwood proposal for V-16 (never built), style #5560 dual-cowl sport phaeton.
60A Style #4160A was a Fleetwood proposal for the 140" V-8 Cadillac chassis of 1929 and 1930 (the initial digits "41" later were used for the exclusive, 4-door Madame X styles on the V-16 chassis); it was a 5-passenger sport phaeton style but the drawing I have does not show a secondary cowl or windshield.  The "A" suffix usually denotes a departure from the regular design; this style has a convex rear body curve and a special belt molding (it might be the reason why V-16 style 4257H, above, frequently is identified as 4257A). The year 1930 saw also a special sport phaeton on the V-16 chassis identified as style #4260A;  the "A" suffix in this case denoted the presence of the so-called Le Baron scalloped hood of  V-16 styles with initial digits "43"; that hood precluded the use of a belt molding; in addition, the car had cloth upholstery in a piped design (cloth is rarely used in convertible cars); the car was one of the official cars [not the pace car] at the 1930 Indianapolis 500, where it was driven by Willard Rader, then superintendent of the experimental garage of the Cadillac Motor Car Co. This unique car was last heard of in 1972 but, like many weird and wonderful special Cadillacs there is no saying it won't turn up again, out of the blue. Although the style was offered again in 1933, none were built. BTW, the designer's drawing I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, shows an open phaeton style with a convex curved trunk area and special, raised (?) hood and belt molding; despite initial digits "42", usually indicating a curved or coach sill, the designer's drawing features  the straight sill of the "43" series designs.

   
V16 designer's drawing (below) and Fleetwood job #4160A, for 1929-30 (top)

4260a.JPG (7875 bytes)

 

60B Design #4160B, a 5-passenger sport phaeton apparently without lift-up secondary cowl and folding windshield for rear seat passengers (the initial digits "41" later were used for the exclusive, 4-door Madame X styles on the V-16 chassis). The car had a plain hood and horizontal belt molding that swept up and over the front cowl behind the flat, slightly-raked windshield; it had slender windshield posts à la Madame X, and front opening doors. In this case, I assume that the "B" suffix denotes the convex rear body and special belt molding. 


Fleetwood job #4160B, for 1929-30


Style #4260B is listed as a 5-passenger Sport Phaeton on the V-16 chassis; however there may be confusion between this and preceding style #4260A, since style #4260B was never built, nor have I ever seen any drawings thereof. The Cadillac so-called sport phaeton generally had a folding dual cowl with an equally folding secondary windshield; on the standard V-16 sport phaeton, however, the secondary cowl was fixed, and quite narrow; it had a crank operated secondary windshield; this style may also be the one identified frequently as style 4257A (see above), although that car is listed in the MPL as a 7-passenger model.  I thought at one time that this style described the car formerly owned by my friends Ray and Dorothy Radford of Portland, Oregon (unlike the regular style #4260, this car features a folding secondary cowl and windshield, in true sport phaeton fashion).  However, I have a copy of a letter sent to the Radfords by the Cadillac company describing the car [engine #702677] as a regular 5-passenger phaeton, with Job #4260 (not #4260B or #4257A); the double cowl and windshield simply were included as "accessories", like the fender-mounted spare wheels. It was the 25th out of the 85 that were built on the V-16 chassis in 1930-31.

60S (1) Style #3260S, a 5-passenger sedan on 132" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1927 and 140" wheel base V-8 chassis for 1928. 1928 also saw a style #3360S, 5-passenger sedan.
60S (2) The Series Sixty Special model introduced in 1938 became popularly known as the 60S in the post-WW2 period.
61 Introduced in 1927, style #3261 was a 5-passenger imperial cabriolet, presumably with a division between the chauffeur and rear seat passenger area; the code was used again in 1928 and 1929; in 1930 it designated style #4161, a special 5-passenger imperial cabriolet on the V-8 chassis, with plain hood, straight sill with narrow saddle across cowl in front of windshield, center opening doors, a "42" series curved or mail coach sill, inward curving rear body panel, stationary top with light-tan colored leather covering fabric-grained to imitate Burbank cloth, sun visor

 v6_4161ad.jpg (140368 bytes)
Fleetwood V16 job #4161, for 1929-30

(the initial digits "41" later were used for the exclusive, 4-door Madame X styles on the V-16 chassis).
Fleetwood built a single such body on the V-16 chassis for 1930 (style #4161); owing to its flat, 18° slanting windshield, slender windshield posts and light-colored window frames it earned full Madame X status; considering that the cost of similar sedan style #4361S was $5950, and that the equivalent Madame X style cost approx. $1000 more, we can estimate the list price of V-16 style #4161 at $6950. Two units of Fleetwood style #4361 were mounted on the 1930-31 V-16 chassis. This style was offered again in 1933 but never built.

61C The landau roof option was available also on V-16 style #4161. However, none were built.  The designer's drawing I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, shows this landau style open.

4161sc.JPG (8923 bytes)

 

61S In 1927 style #3261S was a 5-passenger sedan cabriolet; the number was used again in 1930, e.g. V-8 style #3861S, 5-passenger close-coupled sedan, with full leather back and rear ¼-panels and trunk; it weighed 4850 lbs and cost $4395.
Fleetwood built many bodies of this style on the V-16 chassis (Madame X style #4161S priced at $6950 - 43 units, and #4361S priced at $5950 - 258 units). Both styles featured a painted metal roof and rear quarters and an adjustable front seat finished in cloth trim. The cheaper style (#4361S) had a flat, almost vertical Fisher "VV"-type windshield with stubby windshield posts, one ventilator on either side of the cowl, a dome light combined with a roof ventilator, two inner corner lights and two outer step lights for rear doors. Windows in all doors dropped flush with door moldings, hardware was Fleetwood-designed and fully chrome-plated, there were a flush-type vanity case and smoking case in the rear compartment. Int. finish panels were walnut with burl inlay and ebony inlaid stripe on all doors and instrument panel. Concealed pocket in side arm rest was accessed by raising arm rest pad. Other features and fittings including adjustable rear seat and rear seat back, folding center arm rest [rear seat], curtains on all windows in rear compartment, trunk rack and rear trunk. As usual, car was pre-wired for radio, the latter being available at extra cost. Final digits "61S" were used again in 1933 for a similar body type. Only one unit was built.

 

61SC (1) 1930 V-8 style #3861SC, 5-passenger close-coupled landaulet sedan.
61SC (2) The landau roof option was available also on V-16 style #4161S. However, none were built.  The designer's drawing I got in 2001  [slightly modified - text removed] from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, shows this landau style open. In outward appearance, this style was identical to style #4161, illustrated above.
62 Special V-16 style #4262 (one unit built); described as a 7-passenger imperial cabriolet, this large limousine presumably did not have ¼-windows; it was fitted with two wide, forward-facing auxiliary seats and had a roof covering of English landau leather. At a glance it probably had the same outward appearance as the Fleetwood V-16 style #4275 limousine (of which only one unit was built), except that the latter had ¼-windows and no leather roof covering. I have seen no factory photos of this car (or style #4275 for that matter) but have drawn my own impression of what it might have looked like (I borrowed the sill from the "42" series V-16s, applied the body of the style #4375 and blanked off its ¼-windows).

V6d262.jpg (8287 bytes)

 

63 1933 Fleetwood proposal, style #5563 (which was never built) was described as a 5-passenger sport imperial. It was to feature the special long hood of other 1933 sports models as well as three large, exposed chrome plated hinges. This car could be likened to style "61" with a built-in trunk. It was to feature a 1933 Fleetwood novelty for enclosed cars: the rear trunk behind a protruding, concave-curved panel.
63S 1933 Fleetwood proposal, style #5563S (which was never built); this was to be the sedan version of the preceding car, obtained by omitting the partition.
64 (1) 1930 design #4164 described as a Transformable metal quarter panel Brougham with a Washington coach or boot toe molding curving down from the center post and sweeping forward to the straight body sill; an artist's drawing shows the lower rear body painted with cane work appliqué such as was seen in the three style #4264B town Broughams built later in 1930 on the Series 452 V-16 chassis. The designer's drawing further shows a slightly-raked "V"-type windshield, whereas actual cars built [style #4264B] had a slightly-raked flat windshield. The car featured a plain hood, a straight belt molding curving up and over the cowl, ending in a "V" at its forward edge. Doors were rear opening and the rear body had an inward curve.


Fleetwood job #4164, for 1929-30

 

64 (2)

1930 V-16 style #4264 (4 units built), a standard Fleetwood style, was a so-called razor-edged Brougham described in factory literature as a Transformable town Brougham, i.e. a town car with plain hood, curved or mail coach sill, flat, slightly raked windshield and rear opening doors. Other features included a painted metal roof, square corners, no ¼-windows, two opera-type auxiliary seats, LH facing side, RH facing rear, solid bronze windshield frame painted to match body, swing-out type with chrome plated inner frames, ventilators each side of cowl and one on top, two inner corner lights, two outside step lights for rear doors, glass in front doors, rear doors and division drops flush with moldings, Fleetwood designed chrome-plated hardware, finish panels on front and rear doors, division panel is combined panel and smoking set, concealed pocket in side arm rests (access by raising top pad of arm rest), driver's roof curtain can be folded back with side panels and concealed in compartment in upper front part of body, telephone in slash pocket on RH ¼-panel above arm rest, also porthole in division glass, silk curtains on all windows in rear compartment including division, folding arm rest in center of rear seat back, two arm slings, slash pocket on RH ¼-panel above arm rest for hand mirror, clock on division header bar, adjustable rear seat cushion and seat back. This style was offered again in 1933 but was never built; the newer version (style #5564) was to feature a 1933 Fleetwood novelty for closed-body styles, a concave-curved rear body panel with a door to storage space behind the rear seat (an early version of today's trunk). Roof could be had with or without leather.

4264clo.JPG (7792 bytes)

 

64B

Six style #4264B town Broughams were built on the Series 452 V-16 chassis in 1930. The car was similar in appearance to style #4264 but featured the so-called Washington coach or boot toe sill below the passenger compartment door. Three of the six cars built featured a painted canework appliqué on the lower body and rear panel of the passenger compartment; to quote Walter M. P. McCall: The simulated cane-work was an incredibly time-consuming project. The 'cane' strips were actually strips of thick paint composition, meticulously applied by hand, using a small squeeze tube. Despite the immense amount of time needed to produce a cane-work effect, this method resulted in a far better job than did cementing real cane-work to the body, as the real cane had a tendency to break loose from the metal in a relatively short time. Such a car was one of only two V-16s ready in time for the New York Salon when it opened its doors on 4 January 1930. Appointments of style #4264B were like those of style #4264. Factory records show that body #2 was shipped to New York's Astor Hotel [the Waldorf Astoria] on 12.28.1929, together with the first unit of landaulet style #4108C [see above], presumably for the Show opening. I have what I assume to be factory or press photos of both styles #4108C [looking like style #4155C] and #4264B, both sans V-16 medallion on the wheel covers, taken in what appears to be a vast hotel lounge or ballroom; if any reader recognizes these premises, please let me know. It should be noted that a car very similar to this one, but with a longer body and full-sized jump seats, was built by the European coach builder Bronkhorst; a photo of it appeared in a pre-war French magazine La Carrosserie Automobile [#92].
Style #4264B was offered again in 1933 but was probably considered somewhat passé as none were built. A friend of mine in Ohio bought in the late Eighties a re-bodies or "replica" style #4264B, that is a conversion from an authentic Fleetwood town car style. I believe the conversion was begun in the seventies by Dave Holtzman, a Michigan resident. The car's first owner was a Mr. O.C. Watts; the current owner [1994] still has the original seat back inserts in petit point said to have been specially ordered by the first owner's wife. 

Trivia:   Scale replica manufacturer, Jo-Han, USA, put out in the sixties a kit of style #4264B town car and even reproduced in 1:25 scale the petit point stitching on the rear seat backs design - I am wondering if petit point seat back inserts were standard in all Fleetwood town cars?

4264bclo.JPG (7458 bytes)
The town car (left) is shown with the driver's roof curtain in place
The factory photo (right) shows one of three such styles with French cane applied to the rear body

 

64Q Style #4864Q on the 143" wheel base V-12 chassis for 1931; I assume that the suffix "Q" is the abbreviation for quarter [windows] and that this was a standard razor-edged Brougham design with quarter windows in lieu of blank rear quarters.
A body style similar to this one was built in Holland by the Dutch coach builder, Bronkhorst. It looks like a standard V-16 style #4264B but the body is longer and it has the full jump-seat option.
65 Style #5065, a 7-passenger limousine style on the 140" wheel base Cadillac V-12 chassis for 1932 and similar style #5565 on the 149" wheel base V-16 chassis for 1933; absence of the "cabriolet" label suggests that this was a formal car without the usual leather roof covering. This style could best be described as a 7-passenger version of style #5531 or as a style #5555 car in which the blank rear quarters of the latter were replaced with large ¼-windows. Its painted or chrome window frames and raked windshield place the V-16 version in the Madame X category.
65S V-16 style #5565S (1933); this was the proposed sedan version of the preceding car, in which the partition was removed. None were built.
66 1933 V-16 proposal #5566; this was described as a 7-passenger limousine; again, absence of the "cabriolet" label indicates that there would have been no leather roof covering. This car was to have more rounded lines than style #5565; it would not have been a Madame X model. The large ¼-windows on this style were to be rounded in the upper rear corner, whereas style #5565 had the reverse curve ( ¼-windows rounded in the lower rear corner). In addition the car would have featured the novel 1933 trunk line for sedans, behind a concave-curved rear body panel.
66S 1933 V-16 proposal #5566S; this was to be the sedan version of the preceding car, but like it, none were built.
67 Pre- and post-war styling code digits designating a 2-door convertible style (e.g. V-16 style #9067 convertible coupe, 1938-1940); in the early thirties, similar body styles carried final digits "35".

V6389067.jpg (6875 bytes)
This is just ONE example of a Cadillac style "67" convertible coupe

 

67D Style #6267D (1941); Cadillac used the "D" suffix in 1941 to distinguish its De Luxe models from the plainer ones.
69 Pre- and post-war styling code digits designating a 4-door, 5-passenger sedan (e.g. style #6269, 1942).
69F Style #6069F (1942); this was a car similar to the above style #6069 but equipped with a glass division.

 

70 - 79

73 V-16 style #5573 (1933); the style number is just two digit short of standard Fleetwood limousine style "75" showing it to be a variation on that theme. This car was described as a 7-passenger imperial limousine; lack of the cabriolet extension meant it had no leather roof covering; its roof lines were more curved and gracious than the standard "75" style. Inside it featured a slanting partition and semi-concealed, forward-facing auxiliary seats. This car featured the novel 1933 trunk line: a protruding curved body panel in the rear masking a small built-in trunk. Two units were built.
73S 1933 V-16 styling proposal #5573S; this was to be the sedan version of the preceding car, with no partition. None were built.
74 (1) In 1928, Fleetwood reportedly built a 5-passenger sport cabriolet style #3174, and another with style #3274
74 (2) V-16 style #5574 (1933); the style number is just one digit short of standard Fleetwood limousine style "75" showing it to be a variation on that theme. This car was described as a 7-passenger imperial cabriolet (a limousine with leather-covered roof); its roof line was more curved and gracious than the "75" style and it featured the new trunk line for 1933 behind a protruding, curved panel at the rear. Only one was built.
74S 1933 V-16 Fleetwood proposal #5574S; this was to be the sedan version (i.e. no partition) of the preceding car; none were built.
75 1930 V-8 style #3875, 7-passenger imperial with metal back and rear ¼-panels, 2 forward facing extra seats, upholstered over springs, weight 5090 lbs, cost $4545. This was the standard Fleetwood 7-passenger Limousine. Known as the Fleetwood Fleetdale imperial limousine it was built on 140" wheel base (= 355.5cms.), o.a. length = 211" (= 536cms), o.a. width = 74¾" (= 190cms); style #$975 was similar. Basic styling features are the same as Fleetwood style #3975S, below, with the following exceptions: fully lowering glass partition between front and rear compartments, telephone in slash pocket on RH ¼-panel above arm rest, additional dome light in front compartment, stationary front seat upholstered in leather or cloth as standard robe cord instead of robe rail, silk umbrella nested in RH side of partition.

    30-4175int.jpg (79843 bytes)
Fleetwood "Fleetdale",  job #3975, for 1929-30
[ the sedan version, job#3975-S, looks exactly the same on the outside ]


This period ad shows Fleetwood style #4375 on the V16 chassis


Early units of similar V-16 Madame X style #4175 were built at the old Fleetwood plant in Pennsylvania; they feature the vertical "V" windshield and split, "quarter-moon" instrument panel where half the instrument are in front of the driver and the other half in front of the front seat passenger; 24 units were built with this configuration; the balance (86 units) featured the 18° flat, slanting windshield; base price was $7525. The cheaper V-16 style #4375 [price $6525] featured the scalloped hood, a straight sill, vertical windshield and stubby windshield posts; it was like V-16 style #4375S below except for a lowerable glass division between front and rear compartments with a header bar at roof level, a telephone in a slash pocket on RH ¼-panel, above arm rest, a stationary, leather-covered front seat, an additional dome light in the front compartment; interior finish of this V-16 model included walnut with burl inlay and ebony inlaid stripe on all doors, ¼-windows and instrument panel, a robe cord instead of a robe rail, concealed pockets in rear arm rests with access by raising arm rest top pad, silk curtains on all rear compartment windows including glass division, a silk umbrella nested at RH side of partition, a luggage net at roof level and a sheepskin mat in rear compartment; rear seat cushion and seat back were adjustable individually.

4275.jpg (8926 bytes)
Fleetwood style #4275

 

75B V-16 style #6275B (1935); in this case the "B" indicated a departure from the standard style, which featured ¼-quarter windows; style "75B", on the other hand, had solid rear quarters.
75C Series 355 V-8 style #3975C designated as the Fleetdale imperial. Features are the same as for 1930-31 style #4375, above, but with an opening roof portion over the rear seating area. The price of this car was $7325.
Four such bodies were mounted on the V-16 chassis; two were the coach sill type (style #4275C) and the other two were the cheaper style #4375C with horizontal sill; all were built in Detroit. The landau roof option was available also on V-16 style #4375S (for an extra $800). However, none were built.  The designer's drawing of style #4375C that I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, shows this landau style open.

4275c.JPG (7681 bytes)
Designer's drawing for style #4275C shows it with landaulet roof closed

4375c.JPG (9356 bytes)
Roof opened from "C" pillar back, as seen here on style #4375C

 

75E The "E" suffix suggests a car that has been extended, i.e. built on a longer wheel base than was standard for the model in question.
75FL 1933 V-16 style #5575FL; described as a 7-passenger imperial cabriolet (i.e. a limousine) this car had blank rear quarters like Fleetwood style "55", two forward-facing auxiliary seat, roof covered with English landau leather; it could be ordered with or without imitation landau bars.
75FM This is listed in the Master Parts List (MPL) as being available for both the V-12 and V-16 chassis.  I assume that the 'F" stands for "formal" and the M for "metal", i.e. a formal sedan with a plain metal roof in lieu of the traditional leather covering [it may have been used to distinguish it from the preceding style, in which the L presumably stands for a "leather" roof covering.
75H4 1932 Fleetwood style #5175H4. Factory records give the body number of this car as "37" although only one was built. However, a study of factory records carried out in the early Seventies by Carl L. Steig of the Cadillac-LaSalle Club revealed that the numerical sequence of body numbers for Fisher V-16 style 213, a 7-passenger limousine of which 49 are recorded as having been built, is broken off at body No. 36. It could be, therefore, that Fleetwood style #5175H4 was in fact a Fisher-bodied car of which only the roof height was modified by Fleetwood.
75L Style #3875L on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; a standard 7-passenger imperial with leather roof covering; also style #6075L [1940], Post-war cars with the "L" suffix were usually large sedans and limousines used in the livery business, hence the "L" initial; cars like these were used by funeral houses to carry family and pall-bearers.
75LL Style #6075LL (as above) but livery limousine (i.e. with a glass division) with leather roof covering.
75P Style #3975P; this car was known as the imperial. The "P" suffix indicates that a plain hood replaced the standard, scalloped and so-called Le Baron hood on cars with initial digits "39". I have a designer's drawing from the 1930 Book of Fleetwood.
75S 1930 V-8 style #3875S, 7-passenger sedan; features as above but no divider; also $3975S a 7-passenger sedan. weight 5050 lbs, cost $4295. Fleetwood Fleetdale 7-passenger sedan on 140" wheel base (= 355.5cms.), o.a. length = 211" (= 536cms), o.a. width = 74¾" (= 190cms) weighed 5305 lbs and cost $4595. Basic styling features and equipment are painted metal rear quarters, ¼-windows, adjustable front seat, Fisher "VV" windshield, ventilator on both sides of cowl, combined dome light and ventilator, two inner corner lights, two outer step lights for rear doors, all door windows drop flush with moldings, rear ¼-windows drop only part way, two wide auxiliary seats partly concealed in partition when folded and not in use; vanity case with imported 8-day clock [Jaeger?], Fleetwood-designed French walnut smoking case, carpet-covered foot cushions, bar type robe rail, folding arm rest center of rear seat back, silk curtains on all windows in rear compartment, Fleetwood-designed chromium-plated hardware, car wired for radio [radio optional at extra cost].


Fleetwood "Fleetdale",  job #3975-S, for 1929-30
[ the limousine version,  job#3975, actually is shown ]


V-16 Madame X style #4175S had similar appointments and appurtenances; factory records show that none were built with the vertical "V" windshield; presumably, therefore, all 47 units were built in Detroit. with the flat, 18° slanting windshield. Fittings and fixtures of V-16 style #4375S were similar to those in V-8 style #3975S except front seat had cloth trim, combination ¼-window panel and vanity case on RH side with imported [Jaeger?] 8-day clock, 2 ash trays, mirror and cigarette case; combination ¼-window panel and smoking case on LH side with 2 ash trays and cigar lighter; interior finish of this V-16 model including walnut with burl inlay and ebony inlaid stripe on all doors, ¼-windows and instrument panel, a robe rail, concealed pockets in rear arm rests with access by raising arm rest top pad, silk curtains on all rear compartment windows; rear seat cushion and seat back were adjustable individually. like other models, car was wired for radio, the latter being available at extra cost. All 110 V-16 cars bearing code #4175S were built after April 1930, in the new Fleetwood shops in Detroit.


     Fisher, style #32-16-213 [Fleetwood style #5175], 7-pass. limousine (49 units)
149-inch wheel base

v632l7.JPG (8032 bytes)    v632l7i.jpg (5297 bytes)

 

5175s.JPG (7666 bytes)
1932 version of the Fleetwood  "75S", 7-pass. sedan

 

75SC 1930 V-8 style #3875SC, 7-passenger landaulet sedan; also #3975S 7-passenger imperial; a similar style to those ending with digits "75S" but with a folding roof portion over rear seating area. Fleetwood also offered a similar 2-passenger convertible body as style #4576.
The landau roof option was available also on V-16 style #4375S (for an extra $800). However, none were built.   The designer's drawing of style #4375SC that I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, shows this landau style open.

4375c.JPG (9356 bytes)
In outward appearance, styles #4375C and #4375SC are identical

 

75SFL 1933 V-16 style #5575SFL; this was similar in outward appearance to style #5575FL; inside the car, however, the partition was eliminated so that the car qualified as a 7-passenger imperial sedan.
75SL Style #3875SL on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; a standard 7-passenger sedan with leather roof covering; also post-war style #6075SL, a Livery sedan (no division) presumably used by funeral houses in the late thirties and early forties.
75SX or XS The "X" suffix denotes a special feature not usually found in "75" styles; in this case it denotes a leather roof covering over the rear quarters in lieu of the standard, painted metal roof. e.g. style #3875SX on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928.
75X e.g. style #3875X on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; like style #3875 but with leather roof covering over the rear quarters.
76 (1) In 1927, style #3276 was a 7-passenger imperial cabriolet.
76 (2) In 1928 these digits were used in style #3376 to describe a 7-passenger sedan.
76 (3) In 1929-30 these digits were used in style #4176 to describe a 2-passenger coupe.

    
Fleetwood job #4176, for 1929-30

 

76 (3a) The 1930 design #4176 labeled Two Passenger sport stationary or convertible coupe, although I believe that none of the "76"-type coupes had a convertible top. An artist's drawing [but was the car ever built?] shows a scalloped hood, slightly-raked "V"-type windshield, belt molding curving up and over the cowl, ending in a "V" at its forward edge. The car has rear opening doors, a fixed metal roof with a light-colored and probably leather roof covering fabric-grained to imitate Burbank cloth; despite initial digits "41", it features a "42"-style mail coach sill (the initial digits "41" later were used for the exclusive, 4-door Madame X styles on the V-16 chassis)
Style #4276 (70 units) was one V-16 version of the stationary coupe, with plain hood and curved or mail coach sill; an artist's rendering I have shows a base price of $6850. Style #4376 (98 units) was another V-16 version of the same car [priced at $5800]; the album description mentioned painted metal rear quarters, a "V"-type swing-out windshield in a polished Duralium finished frame, three hood ventilators (one on either side and one on top of cowl), two inner corner lights, a light in the rear compartment (rumble seat) controlled by a switch on the side golf door; both door windows were lowerable flush with door moldings.; rear window (back light) was also lowerable; rumble seat lid catch was controlled from inside; interior hardware was Fleetwood-designed and chrome-plated; the seat cushion was entirely adjustable, and there were flush-type ash trays as well as finish panels on the doors; finally, there was a silk curtain on the rear window. and the car was wired for radio (the latter being optional at extra cost); this style was no longer offered on the V-16 chassis in the latter part of 1930; it no longer appears on the price-list dated 15 October 1930. The last V-16 style, #4476, presumably replaced the preceding style; it was built in Detroit, style #4476 was a stationary coupe with plain in lieu of scalloped hood and a flat, 18° slanting windshield à la Madame X in lieu of the swing out "V" type. The car does not earn full Madame X status although the Madame X windshield feature is mentioned in factory sales literature; 11 units were built at a price of $5800 each. Final digits "76" were used again in 1933 for a similar body type.


Fleetwood  style #4276 stationary coupe for 2 passengers

 

77 (1) 1932 V-16 style #5177, a unique 8-passenger imperial body style commissioned for the wealthy Annenberg family and built in 1932 on a special stretched 452-B V-16 chassis [165" wheel base (= 419cms)]; the car featured a full-length roof rack and pull-down silk shades on all rear windows.
77 (2) La Salle style #5077 (1935 - 756 units) and Cadillac style #6077 (1936), a 2-passenger coupe style. The 1933 Fleetwood catalog included style #5577 (just one digit higher than the regular 2-passenger coupe style "76"); it was a variation on the standard 2-passenger coupe theme for 1933, with a short belt molding and no baggage doors. None were built.
78 (1) Cadillac style #3078 graced the 1927 chassis; it was a 7-passenger cabriolet, in other words a sedan with a leather roof covering.
78 (2) 1933 Fleetwood V-16 proposal #5578 (just two digits short of the regular All-Weather phaeton style "80") was a special All-Weather phaeton (none were built); it was to have featured three large, exposed chrome-plated hinges on the center pillars. These are not featured on the designer's drawing, below:

v6drg_5578.jpg (8443 bytes)
This one was never built

 

79 Style #5579 (just one digit short of the regular All-Weather phaeton style "80") was a special All-Weather phaeton with sloping rear in lieu of trunk, chrome-plated window frames à la Madame X and three exposed chrome hinges on center pillars. Eight were built in 1933.
79A V-16 style #5579A (1933); this was a variation on the preceding style. It was fitted with a special trunk.

 

80 - 89

80

1930 V-8 styles #3180 [without glass partition], 5-passenger AWP model with Burbank top, back and rear quarters, inside bow, fully collapsible, weight 4880 lbs, cost $5750; same style with glass partition was style #3880 [see below]; weight 4890 lbs, cost $5995] and #3980 [both with division], the car weighed 4975 lbs and cost $4700. The latter style was labeled the Fleetwood Fleetway All-Weather phaeton on 140" wheel base (= 355.5cms), o.a. length 211" (= 536cms.), o.a. width = 74¾" (= 190cms.). There were also offered 5-passenger All-Weather phaeton styles #4080 (1929-30), the latter had a plain hood in lieu of the trademark Fleetwood scalloped hood, #4580, #4680 and #4780 in 1931. This was a fully collapsible style with dipped belt molding at the rear so that belt appeared horizontal all round when the top was lowered; the car featured Burbank top and rear quarters; there were no ¼-windows; roof bows were inside (no visible external landau bows); there was a glass partition between front and rear compartment that lowered fully between collapsible center pillars or could be left up as tonneau windshield; there was a stationary front seat, swing-out "V" windshield in polished Duralium frame (full chrome on V-16 style 4280), ventilators each side of cowl, another on top, two step lights for rear doors, all windows drop flush with moldings, Fleetwood chromium-plated hardware, flush type ash receivers in all inner door panels, carpet-covered foot cushions combining foot rest and hassock features, robe strap [called robe "cord" in V-16 description], folding arm rests in center of both front and rear seats, envelope (cover) for top when folded back; car wired for radio [radio optional at extra cost]. Cars of this style could be ordered without the secondary windshield.

   

30-3980FWay2.jpg (26234 bytes)     30-3980Fway3.jpg (25170 bytes)
Fleetwood "Fleetway", Job #3980, for 1929-30

   

   30-4080LasA.jpg (23199 bytes)     30-4080LasB.jpg (22947 bytes)
Fleetwood "Fleetway", Job #4080 on LaSalle chassis, for 1929-30


Partial designer's drawing (fully retracted top and side glass)


This Fleetwood all-weather Phaeton features a 3-position top that can be configured as either a closed car, a Town Car with open chauffeur, or as a convertible. It is indicative of the quality and features which have made Cadillac V16s the standard of excellence in Classic cars.  Its opening vee windshield and divider window are the epitome of sleek luxury and exclusivity. Dual sidemount spares with rear view mirrors, Pilot-Ray driving lights, top boot and a luggage trunk on a folding rack completed its exhaustive equipment list. There are few greater American "classics" than the Cadillac V16, and no body style more adaptable and attractive than the Fleetwood AWP or convertible sedan. According to the "Options" list in an early V-16 catalog, the factory charged a buyer $200 to have this style built without the secondary windshield. An artist's drawing from an early V-16 styling album, shows the car with a straight sill instead of the mail coach sill and a special door-top molding; only three cars of this style were built. Style #4380 (250 units) [initial price $6650 in January 1930, reduced to $5750 in October 1930] was another V-16 style with features similar to other Fleetwood styles with final digits "80". The designer's drawings I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, show three different positions for the top [I have a similar artist's rendering from an early Fleetwood V-16 catalog]. Final digits "80" were replaced by "29" in second generation V16s to designate the convertible sedan style. Another V-16 style, #4280, saw three units built.

     4380op2.JPG (8136 bytes)

4280clo.JPG (7873 bytes)     4280op.JPG (7928 bytes)
Style #4280, directly above

 

Survivors: The collector-auctioneers Barrett-Jackson offered such a convertible sedan for sale in the early Nineties on 1934 V-16 chassis #5100023. There are a few others (about three dozen, actually) on the Series 452/452A chassis.

There was a Fleetwood proposal #5580 for the 1933 V-16 chassis, but none were actually built.  Here is a designer's drawing of that proposed all-weather phaeton, drawn from a 1933 Fleetwood brochure:

v6drg_5580.jpg (7930 bytes)
This one was never built

 

80A 1930 V-16 proposed style #4280A. The designer's drawing I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, is of an all-weather phaeton with center-hinged doors and a special belt molding, dipping at the rear like Fleetwood style #4200. There is also a very special rear body treatment, like a rounded, double boat-tail.

4280a.JPG (8554 bytes)

 

80P Style #3880-P, an all-weather phaeton, with plain hood in lieu of the Fleetwood raised panel type, built on the 1929 Cadillac 341 chassis for that year's Auto Salon
81 (1) 1930 V-8 style #3981 a stationary cabriolet, that is a sedan with fabric-grained roof covering imitating Burbank cloth. It had removable center window posts, a wide upper belt molding that dipped at the rear to simulate a convertible sedan, style, a small roof ventilator. The car was similar in appearance to style #3982 but the latter included ¼-windows; weight of style #3981 was 4650 lbs, price $3245; 4081 was the style number given to a similar 5-passenger car applied to the La Salle chassis and termed the Fleetwind sedanette cabriolet; its weight was 4600 lbs and the price $3725: the latter had a plain hood in lieu of the trademark Fleetwood scalloped hood. One single 1930-31 V-16 chassis received this body style.


Fleetwood "Fleetwind", Job #4081 on LaSalle chassis, for 1929-30

 

81 (2) Style #4381; these final digits came to be used in late 1930 to identify the 5-passenger town coupe [priced at $5950]; despite initial digits "43", V-16 style #4381 has a plain instead of a scalloped hood and light colored window frames à la Madame X. Nonetheless, this style did not earn full Madame X status. The RH front seat folded forward to facilitate entrance and exit of three rear seat passenger The car had spacious luggage compartment; 98 units were mounted on the V-16 chassis. This body type was built again in 1932 and 1933; it retained the "81" style code.

5181.jpg (7039 bytes)
1932 Fleetwood style #5181

 

82 1930 V-8 style #3982, shown in the Book of Fleetwood, 9.16.1929, on p.33. On 134" wheel base (= 340cms.), o.a. length 211" (= 536cms), o.a. width = 74¾" (= 190cms.) The basic styling features are similar to style #3981, above, except that this style features ¼- windows in the rear; these were only partly lowerable; weight was 4675 lbs., price $3245. This 5-passenger sedan has also an imitation convertible top made up of a fabric-grained leather looking like Burbank cloth. On p.55 of the Book of Fleetwood for 9.16.1929 is another similar 5-passenger car, style #4082 for the La Salle chassis, termed the Fleetwind sedanette, this time on 140" wheel base (= 355.5cms), o.a. length 211" (= 536cms.), o.a. width 74¾" (= 190cms); the appointments and appurtenances were said to be similar to style #4081, except that the #4082  Fleetwind1 model had a plain hood and  ¼-windows in which the glass was only partly lowerable; in style #4081 the glass in all windows lowered flush with the belt moldings, and the window pillars could be removed to give the look of a phaeton with top raised; weight was 4600 lbs and the car was priced at $3825.

   

30-3982Fwind4.jpg (25175 bytes)
Fleetwood "Fleetwind", Job #4082 on La Salle chassis, for 1929-30
[ despite their different style numbers, Fleetwood jobs ending both in "81" and "82" got the same "Fleetwind" appellation ]

   
 

 

83 (1) Style #4883 a so-called 7-passenger limousette (with division glass), as opposed to sedanette (without division) on the 143" wheel base V-12 Cadillac chassis for 1931; this would be the limousine version of the Fleetwood body style described above and identified by final digits "82"
83 (2) Style #5583, a unique 2-passenger coupe built on the 149" wheel base V-16 Cadillac chassis for 1933 although not included among the individual body styles offered on the 1933 V-16 chassis; this is an exception to the Fleetwood rule of giving the same identification code to the same or similar body styles.
85 (1) In 1928 a 7-passenger sedan style #3185 was on the Fleetwood order book.
85 (2) Style #3885 offered on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928. this was described as a convertible sedan.
85 (2a) Style #4185 offered on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1929-30. this was described as a 5p. convertible Victoria

    30-4185b.jpg (27081 bytes)
Fleetwood job #4185, for 1929-30

 

85 (3) 1930 design #4185 was described as a Four Passenger all weather coupe but more commonly referred to as a convertible Victoria. An artist's drawing [was such a car ever built?] shows scalloped hood, slightly-raked "V"-type windshield, belt molding curving up and over the cowl, ending in a "V" at its forward edge. The belt molding has a convex curve dipping downwards at rear, level with the door edge, so that when the convertible top was down, the belt seemed horizontal all the way round. The car has front. opening doors, a convertible top probably done in a light-colored, fabric-grained leather imitating Burbank cloth. Despite initial digits "41" (later were used for the exclusive, 4-door Madame X styles on the V-16 chassis), the car features a "42"-style mail coach sill. A trunk is mounted behind the almost vertical rear body. At the top LH side of the artist's drawing is a smaller view of this model drawn with the top down.
Two such bodies were mounted on the 1930-31 V-16 chassis. Similar body types were built in 1933.

4285clo.JPG (7102 bytes)
V-16 style #4285 - only two were built

 

86 A style just one digit higher than regular Victoria style "85" was a 1933 Fleetwood proposal  #5586 for the V-16; described as a 4-passenger convertible coupe with trunk built in to the body, none were ever produced.

v633-5586cust.jpg (36166 bytes)
This one was never built

 

89A(1) 1930-31 Fleetwood style #3289A. Production records indicate that this style was NOT built. Nonetheless, in 2001, I got a copy of a Fleetwood designer's drawing  [slightly modified - text removed] for this proposed style from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous. It shows a stylish town car with canework applied to the rear body and two coach lamps mounted high on either side of the open front compartment. Records show that one special style #3289B [NOT #3289A] was built and I am assuming it was based on this design, but with a modification from the original drawing (my guess is that the original had a painted metal roof while the car that was built got a padded leather roof. However, I repeat, this is pure conjecture; it could equally have had the canework removed from around the rear body.

3289a.JPG (13565 bytes)

 

89A(2) Style #5789A on 146" wheel base V-12 Cadillac chassis for 1935; this is described in factory records as a 4-passenger Victoria coupe; consequently it has no relationship with the preceding style nor with 1937 style #7589A, a 5-passenger coupe on 138" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis.
89B [exception] To this writer's knowledge there only was one Fleetwood body style with these final digits; the suffix "B" usually indicates a non-standard body feature. I have seen three other Fleetwood styles starting with digits "32" and these were built in 1928 on the 152" wheel base chassis.
My hunch, that this body was built on a left-over 152" wheel base 1928 chassis ...proved to be very wrong, in 2001, when I acquired a copy of the Fleetwood factory drawing for style #3289A [see above]. Described as a 7-passenger Transformable town cabriolet, i.e. a town car, this one is reported to have had the regular, chrome finished, solid bronze, "V"-type windshield frame, whereas the factory drawing for style #3289A, above, shows a special windshield, similar in design to that used on styles #4260 and #4260A. The car had wide auxiliary seating and a leather covered roof. My initial guess that this car was a variation on the #4391 styling theme [see below], was not far out; it was the habit of Fleetwood to use a number very close to a standard styling code for such variations; in this case, digits "89" are just two short of "91", a town car featuring ¼-windows and a plain painted metal roof. The factory description for this car mentions neither ¼-windows nor solid quarters; since the car had a leather roof, my guess is that we are looking at a "91" style town car with no quarter windows and a full leather roof.

 

90 - 99

90 1933 V-16 style #5590. A variation on the "91" theme (below) as indicated by the styling code which is just one digit short of the standard code for this ¼-window town car, this car featured a 1933 Fleetwood novelty in the form of a, concave-curved rear body panel with a door to storage space behind the rear seat (an early version of today's trunk). None were built.
91 (1) 1927 style 3291 limousine brougham, 1928 style #3591, a 7-passenger town car with metal roof, large ¼-windows and forward-facing auxiliary seats, weighing 5135 lbs and costing $5005. Also 1929 V-8 styles #3591 weighing 5030 lbs with a starting price of $5000 and 1930 version, style #3991, weighing 5305 lbs and costing $4145; the latter car appears also in the 1930 Book of Fleetwood, 9.16.1929, on p.43. One unit was mounted on the V-16 chassis in 1930 [style #3991]. This was a standard Fleetwood 7-passenger town car on 140" wheel base (= 355.5cms), o.a. length 211" (= 536cms), o.a. width 74¾" (= 190cms) labeled the Fleetbourne Limousine Brougham. Also known as a Transformable Brougham owing to the removable portion of roof over the driver's compartment. The car featured rear opening doors, a painted metal roof, ¼-windows, two extra-wide auxiliary seats without arm rests that were partly concealed when folded against front partition, a solid bronze "V"-type slanting windshield in fully chromium finished or black-painted frame, ventilators each side of cowl plus one on top, dome light combined with roof ventilator, two inner corner lights, two outside step lights for rear doors, front door windows, rear door windows and division glass all drop flush with moldings, rear ¼-windows only partly lowerable, driver's roof curtain and steel side supports carried under front seat when not in use, Fleetwood-designed chromium-plated hardware, combination LH ¼-window panel and vanity case with imported [Jaeger?] 8-day clock, two ash trays, mirror and cigarette case; combination RH ¼-window panel and smoking case with two ash trays and cigar lighter; Fleetwood-designed French walnut smoking case, telephone in slash pocket on RH rear quarter panel above arm rest, two carpet-covered foot cushions, robe strap, folding arm rest in center of rear seat back, silk curtains on all windows in rear compartment including glass division, silk umbrella [nested at RH side of division partition?], car wired for radio [radio optional at extra cost].


1927 Style #2891 Limousine Brougham?
1927 Style #3291 Limousine Brougham was similar but with a longer body

30-3991FBourn.jpg (65046 bytes)     30-3991int.jpg (101608 bytes)
Fleetwood "Fleetbourne, Job #3991, for 1929-30 (needlepoint seat back stitching was optional at extra cost)

28Flt3591.jpg (10459 bytes)     P28tbggn.jpg (7647 bytes)
Left:  style 3591 on display at the NY Commodore hotel in November, 1927
Right: Illustration from the superb 1928 product brochure, Nature's Studio

4291.jpg (21885 bytes)
V-16 style #4291 [factory photo]


Style #4291 (14 units) which I saw in an early V-16 photo album {ZTV collection***} has the curved or mail coach sill and a similar description, except for a flat, swing-out slanting windshield in solid bronze frame painted to match body, with chrome plated inner frames. Interior finish panels were walnut with burl inlay and ebony stripe on rear doors and division [division had a porthole]; there was a combination finish panel and smoking case across center division. Side arm rests had concealed pocket (access by raising top pad of arm rest); driver's curtain could be folded back completely and concealed in compartment in upper front part of body. Robe cord on division and arm slings at rear door edge; adjustable rear seat back and cushion; clock on division header bar. Further V-16 style #4391 (30 units) [initially priced at $7150 but reduced to $6525 in October 1930] has a similar description to style #3991 except only chromium windshield. In addition to the standard robe cord and silk umbrella, there was a luggage net at roof level and a sheepskin mat on the floor; rear, seat and seat back were both adjustable. Both V-16 styles #4291 and #4391 have rear opening doors; the former has the plain hood and mail coach sill whereas the latter has the scalloped hood and straight sill. A popular style, "91" production continued in 1933.

4291clo.JPG (7778 bytes)
Style #4291

4391clo.JPG (7722 bytes)
Style #4391

 

91 (2) Cadillac style #7591 (1937), a post-war Limousine brougham with plain rear.
91B V-16 style #5891B (1934-35) was a modified town brougham with no leather applied to the roof and no quarter windows. Here is a factory designer's drawing of that style for 1934.

v6drg5891B.jpg (8514 bytes)

 

91C V-8 style #3591C; like styles ending with digits "91" except folding roof portion over rear seating area. The landau roof option was available also on V-16 (style #4391C) for an extra $800, but none were built, although the style number appears on a printed   "Chart of Body Types, Style or Job Numbers and Wheelbase" that I got in May 2009 from V-16 owner-enthusiast, Rick LeForge, and which appears to be an excerpt from a factory piece .

4291c.JPG (7750 bytes)

4391cdg.jpg (9433 bytes)
The two preceding styles were NOT built

 

91CP Style #3591CP offered on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; as above but with plain instead of scalloped hood.
91P Style #3591P offered on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; as for style #3591, above, but with plain instead of scalloped hood.
 

92 (1)

1933 V-16 styling proposal #5592. A variation on the "91" theme (above) as indicated by the styling code which is just one digit higher than the standard code for this ¼-window town car; this car was to feature a plain, painted metal roof and the new trunk treatment (in this case a convex-curved rear body panel with a door to storage space behind the rear seat. None were built.
92 (2) Cadillac style #7592 (1937), a post-war Limousine brougham, like post-war style "91" but with a trunk at the rear.
97 Among the 1928 Fleetwood offerings was style #3097, a 5-passenger limousine.
99 (1) In 1928-29 Fleetwood also built a 2-passenger coupe style #3199.(designer's drawing shows 1929 fender-mounted parking lights)
99 (2) V-16 style #5599 (1933); these digits were used for the special, aerodynamic coupe built on the V-16 chassis for the 1933 World's Fair in Chicago dubbed Century of Progress; it was used subsequently for all Cadillac Aero coupes of which only twenty were built on the V-8, V-12 and V-16 chassis, from 1933 to 1937.

v6drg5599.jpg (9109 bytes)     V6335599.jpg (9979 bytes)
An artist's rendering is at the left, and the actual car at the right

 

 

Unknown Style Number


I have photos of a 452 Series V-16 sport phaeton with an alleged "factory-installed" 1929 body [presumably by Fisher]. The car features a Le Baron-type scalloped hood; formerly it was exhibited at Obie's Autorama, Box 73, Paramus, New Jersey.  Restored (I guess) in the Eighties and repainted cream and black, I saw it advertised for sale by auction in the late Eighties. Can anyone provide current information or body tag numbers (including job or style number) for this car?  It resembled the artist's drawing for style 4160 except that on the actual car the standard hood scallop extends quite far back into the front door.

V629flt.jpg (11400 bytes)    v629Pha3.jpg (17006 bytes)

 

 

Names given to the standard
Fleetwood Styles
in 1930

Fleetbourne Limousine Brougham style #3991; 7-pass. town car with large quarter windows

30FBourn3991.JPG (64763 bytes)

 

Fleetcliff La Salle style #4002 roadster

30lsFclif.jpg (19216 bytes)

 

Fleetcrest 7-pass. town car style #3925 with leather rear and no quarter windows

30fcrest.jpg (8747 bytes)

 

Fleetdale 7-pass. sedan style #3975S, limousine style #3975, landaulet sedan style #3975SC and landaulet limousine style #3975C, all with large quarter windows

Fdale_s.jpg (8024 bytes)    fdalesc.JPG (5812 bytes)

 

Fleetdene 5-pass. sedan style #3930S, limousine style #3930, landaulet sedan style #3930SC and landaulet limousine style #3930C, all with small quarter windows

Fdene_s.jpg (9546 bytes)    fdenesc.JPG (6436 bytes)

 

Fleetdowns 2-pass. roadster style #3902

30fdowns.JPG (7771 bytes)

 

Fleetlands Large, custom 1930 La Salle touring car style #4057

ls30pha2.jpg (8465 bytes)

 

Fleetmere 5-pass. sedan style #3955S, limousine style #3955, landaulet sedan style #3955SC and landaulet limousine style #3955C, all with enclosed rear quarters

Fmere_s.jpg (8366 bytes)    fmeresc.JPG (6481 bytes)

 

Fleetmont 7-pass town car style #3920 with leather rear and small ¼- windows

fmont.jpg (8481 bytes)

 

Fleetshire La Salle custom style #4060 phaeton

30fshire.JPG (8188 bytes)

 

Fleetway All-Weather phaeton style #3980

30fway.JPG (8128 bytes)

 

Fleetwick 5-pass. town car style #3912 with enclosed rear quarters

30fwick.JPG (8536 bytes)

 

Fleetwind 1 La Salle custom style #4082, a fixed-top sedanette with the looks of a covered All-Weather phaeton; a similar body style on the Cadillac chassis was numbered #3982

30fwind.jpg (7630 bytes)

 

Fleetwind 1 La Salle Fleetwind  sedanette cabriolet, style #4081

fwindls.jpg (7245 bytes)

 

1   Private message for Harry and Judy:  we love cruising aboard
     your very own,  special Fleetwind   (she is indeed  worthy of her name)

 

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