[last update: 05.26.2020]

Cadillac Styling

 

The Fleetwood
System of Styling Codes

Part 2a

Go to the second part of this Section
or go back to the Styling index page
or view a summary of the Fisher styling codes

 

       

And now here is a list of the final two digits (with letter suffix as the case may be) of all the Fleetwood styling codes I have come across to date. It is based on a scrutiny of factory literature from my own and other collections, as well as in public libraries.  In the right-hand column is a description of the car's general appearance (some of these descriptions are yet to be completed).

To facilitate your research, if you are an enthusiast, like me, of the sixteen-cylinder Cadillac models, entries highlighted in red type indicate that at least one body style with these final digits was built on the V-16 chassis.

Entries in italics denote body styles featured and offered in factory brochures and literature although none are recorded as ever having been built.

 

Highlighted in red:  Styles that were built on the sixteen-cylinder Cadillac chassis


00 - 09

00 (1) 1927 style #3200, a town car for 7 passengers with leather-covered roof and opera seats
00 (2) 1928 style #8000, a 7-passenger sedan with metal back, full ¼-windows and front facing auxiliary seats
00 (2a) 1929 style #8600, was described as a Convertible Landau Cabriolet designed to be owner driven; with imperial partition added, it became style #8605 (below)
00 (3) Also built in 1928 was style #3300, described as a 7-passenger convertible cabriolet
00 (4) 1930 style #4200, a unique 7-passenger limousine style built on the early V-16 chassis [Series 452]. Read all about it in the Database section on the sixteen-cylinder Cadillac models. I was fortunate to get a factory designer's drawing for this style  [slightly modified - text removed], in 2001, from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous. 

4200DGSM.JPG (9411 bytes)

 

00L 1928 style #8000L, a 7-passenger sedan on the 140" wheel base V-8 chassis for 1928; this car featured a leather roof covering. The suffix "L" was used also to designate a car used in "Livery" service
02 (1) 1927 style #3202, a 2-passenger coupe with rumble seat

 

 

02 (2) (a) 1930 style #3902 Fleetdowns, a 2-passenger roadster on 140" wheel base (= 355.5cms); the overall length of this car was 211" (= 536 cms.), o.a. width: 74¾" (= 190 cms); basic equipment included an adjustable front seat, flat, non-glare, swing-out, folding windshield, a cowl-top ventilator, rain-tight side-curtains stowed in a compartment in back of the front seat, a rumble seat, carpet mats in the front and rear compartments, chromium-plated foot rail in the rumble area, a small door on the RH side of rear body for access to the rear compartment, a cover for the top when folded down, Fleetwood-designed chromium-plated hardware

(b) style #4002 termed the La Salle Fleetcliff roadster in the Book of Fleetwood; a 2-passenger convertible style with folding windshield and rumble seat as above; the price was $2450;

(c) style #4502, Cadillac 2-passenger roadster, 1931

(d) style #4602 La Salle roadster in the Book of Fleetwood; a 2-passenger convertible style with folding windshield and rumble seat as above; 150 were built; the price was $2450;

(e) style #4702, Cadillac V-12 2-passenger roadster, 1931


Fleetwood "Fleetdowns", Job #3902 (Cadillac - top) and "Fleetcliffe", Job #4002  (LaSalle - bottom), for 1929-30

 

(f) V-16 style #4302, again a 2-passenger roadster with rumble seat; I have an artist's drawing of the LH side; the base price is shown as $5350; 105 units were built.


Jack Tallman's former Fleetwood V-16 roadster, style #4302
(acquired in 2011 by Brent Merrill of Toronto, Canada)

 

02 (4) In 2011-12 a Dutch aficionado decided to build a roadster on the 1933 V16 chassis, based on Fleetwood catalog drawings (style #5502); such a creation may not be properly termed "replica", "reproduction" or "recreation" roadsters, since none were affectively built by Fleetwood. The term "fake" is perhaps too strong; I call these creations "imitation" or "modern-day" roadsters inspired by original Fleetwood designs. A similar "imitation" was built ona 1934 Cadillac V16 chassis by a well-known Chicago repair shop (Fran Roxas) in the 80s (style #5802)


Above, an artist's painting and a technical drawing of the proposed roadster style #5502, built in Holland


This other  "imitation" 1934 Fleetwood V16 roadster was built in Chicago, in the late 80s

 

02 (5) Probably "job" rather than "style" #9002, this was one of two special 4-door sedans built on the 148" wheel base V-16 chassis in 1938. This one was a fastback style; it was built on chassis/engine #5270306 for GM Vice-President William "Bunkie" Knudsen. Its special features are described in CLC story, 6/91 by Ron Van Gelderen. Click here to read about it.  A second special job, also on a 148" wheel base chassis, with 1938 V-16 chassis/engine #5270306 carried a similar "job" number [probably #9003, #9004 or #9005]. It was built for GM Chairman Alfred P. Sloan. Nothing is known of its special features, although I believe the build sheet is available in the factory archives

V6389002.jpg (6976 bytes)
1938 V-16 fastback, job #9002 built for
GM Vice-President William "Bunkie" Knudsen

V69002f.jpg (11768 bytes)     v638knud.jpg (13247 bytes)
[ Photos of the surviving car:  courtesy my dear friend Katie Robbins ]

 

03 Style 4503 on 134" wheel base V-8 (and V12?) Cadillac chassis for 1931; this was described as a 7-passenger sedan; the number was used again in 1936-37 for style #7503.


I found these poor copies of factory designers' drawings (blue-prints) on Internet, in the New Millennium;
my intention in cleaning them up, albeit only in part, is to show the basic body lines and seating arrangements

 

03L Style #7503L (1937); a formal version of the former 7-passenger sedan; presumably the "L" suffix meant "Livery" rather than "Leather" in this case, these large sedans and limousines being frequently used as chauffeur-driven rentals
04 In early 1997 one of my knowledgeable correspondents viewed some original Fleetwood art work for 1931 including a styling proposal #4804 which I assume was a custom 2-passenger coupe or convertible (to my knowledge it was never built)
05 (1) 1928 style #8005, a 7-passenger sedan with leather covered roof, no landau irons, full ¼-windows and forward-facing auxiliary seats [McC, p.122]
05 (2) 1929 style #8605, was described as a Convertible Landau Cabriolet with imperial partition, derived from style #8600 (the owner-driven version)
05 (3) 1930-31 V-16 proposal, style #4205; this was called a Fleetwood touring car; the designer's drawing  [slightly modified - text removed] I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, shows a large open car, with Fleetwoods "V" windshield, no auxiliary seating and a spacious fitted trunk in the rear; unlike other V-16 designs this one featured vertical hood louvers similar to those used on the 1929 and 1930 Fleetwood styles, as well as the older style, bulbous tail-lights and two-bar bumpers front and rear.

4205.jpg (9328 bytes)

 

06 (1) Style #4206 on the 1930 Series "452" V-16 chassis was a unique 2-door, 2-passenger hardtop coupe which Fleetwood termed a Stationary coupe cabriolet; the term "cabriolet", a favorite with Fleetwood, is a misnomer in that the French word cabriolet means a convertible, whereas all the Fleetwood so-called "cabriolets" were ...hardtops, featuring a leather [or cloth ???] covering applied to the fixed metal roof; the French designation "faux-cabriolet" (a false or imitation convertible) would have been more appropriate. A press photo of this car shows it to have a light-colored top suggesting the use of the fashionable French coupienne, a fabric-grained leather imitating Burbank material; this was a styling feature popular with Californian buyers and it is possible that cars thus "covered" were finished in Los Angeles by specialists at the Don Lee body works. [H, p.65). Style #4206 featured a special belt molding and a split "V"-type, slightly raked windshield, false landau bars and a rumble seat; only one was built. I got a designer's drawing [slightly modified - text removed] for this style, in 2001, from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous.

4206DGSM.JPG (8604 bytes)

 

06 (2) In this case, I believed the number merely indicates "special job" #9006 on the second generation V-16 chassis, the Series 90.  This was a special,  unique 4-door convertible sedan. Two were built as a White House security cars; they were delivered to the secret service and were in use for many years; the V-16 motors subsequently were replaced by V-8s for reasons of economy. These huge cars were built on an extended wheel base chassis (165" [4m19] instead of 141" [3m58]).  Click here to read more about them.

V6389006.jpg (6716 bytes)
Montage by the author, based on Fleetwood V-16 style #9029

9006aaa.jpg (25820 bytes)     9006aab.jpg (27954 bytes)
One of the two surviving cars

 

07 Style #4207 built in March 1930 on the 1930 Series 452 V-16 chassis [three (3) units only]; this is a rare 2-door, 2-passenger coupe termed Stationary coupe cabriolet by Fleetwood; like style #4206 it had a fixed, leather covered roof; factory photos and drawings again show a light top color suggesting the use of the fashionable French coupienne, a fabric-grained leather imitating Burbank; style #4207 featured a special belt molding and flat, slanting windshield, false landau bars and a rumble seat. Of the three such cars completed; the first of them, on V-16 chassis No. 701078, was shipped to Dave Towell Cadillac in Akron, Ohio, on 15 April 1930; the body was painted black with silver (argent) moldings, while the chassis and underside of the fenders were painted emerald green [wow !]; the fenders featured chrome edge moldings [a styling feature that became popular again in the 60s and 70s!] and the car sported the modish wire wheels; the (presumably pessimist) owner of this particular car ordered it with two side-mounted spares ...as well as a third spare concealed under the rear deck  (he probably was the kind to wear suspenders ...and a belt!)  A radio and hood locks [left and right] completed the accessory equipment. The owner was a wealthy person, being able to spend $9875 for the car; this was an astronomical sum right after the Wall Street crash in black October 1929 ...and considering that a new Chevy could be bought for less than $500 (in 1930 the V-16 chassis alone cost $4800)! This lovely coupe cost more than the most highly-priced of all the basic Fleetwood V-16 body styles, i.e. the razor-edged town brougham, style #4264B, that listed for $9500. I got a designer's drawing [slightly modified - text removed] for this style, in 2001, from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous.

4207.jpg (8671 bytes)

 

07 (2) Pre- and post-war styling code digits, e.g. style #6107, Cadillac's first fastback coupe, built in 1942, and style #6207, a more luxuriously finished fastback coupe also built in 1942, as well as from 1946 through 1949
08 (1) 1928-29 style #3208-C [below], termed an "Imperial Landaulette" (with folding rear roof quarters) was reportedly built "for an important motor-car executive" on a late 1929 Cadillac 314-B  commercial chassis [#336343 - body #13140] on the 152"  [3m86] wheelbase; it was 4" (10cms) longer than the V-16 chassis later used from 1930 (... and almost as long as the chassis for the 1934-37 V16s). The top was covered with Coupienne (a fabric-grained leather  introduced at the 1928 Paris Salon by renowned French coach-builder, Georges Kellner; it was said to be easier to clean than regular fabric or leather. The following year, Fleetwood put this rare body style on four V16 chassis [below] wheel base chassis.  This car features a special, curved or "coach" sill that previewed the first-generation V-16 models identified by initial digits "42..".  The parking lights were mounted on the front fenders, as they would be on all 1929 Cadillac models.   The descriptive text added that the sporting effect of the body is enhanced by the mail coach sill and the light leather top which has a Burbank grain. The car was finished in maroon and Paris gray, the latter being used for the splashers, fenders, moldings, top leather and trunk which was covered with the same Burbank-grained leather as the top, and harmonized pleasingly with the contour of the top. The wires wheels were chromium-plated. The car had a Neutralite glass visor giving true traffic light colors, narrow front corner pillars [a la Madame X], an automatic ventilator in the roof and no finish molding over the roof joint. A division glass separated the driver and passenger compartments and the interior was trimmed in maroon [Radel?] Aero leather on both the seats and doors; a dark maroon snakewood was used on the door and division friezes.


The photo shows the special landaulet-style body with functional landau irons,
described as a 5-passenger inside-drive cabriolet with collapsible rear quarters

 

08 (2) Fleetwood V-16 style #4208 was termed an imperial cabriolet; today we would call it a hardtop limousine; it had a glass division between the driver and passenger compartments. Like the above car and like styles #4206 and #4207, it featured the fashionable, light-colored leather top imitating Burbank, which was much in vogue in Europe. Auto writers of the time referred to it as the leather which has the modish fabric grain or "coupienne"; the latter word was coined by French coach builder, Alexis Kellner, who had introduced the new material at the 1928 Paris Salon to overcome  the difficult chore of cleaning light-colored canvas tops. Fleetwood exhibited a similar car  [style #4200], on the 1930 V-16 chassis, at the following Paris Salon, in October.  The leather faux-convertible   tops were popular with Californian buyers.  It is possible that such cars were finished by Don Lee in San Francisco. Only eight units of V-16 style #4208 were built. I got a designer's drawing [slightly modified - text removed]  for this style, in 2001, from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous. It features a spacious, rack mounted trunk in the rear.

4208.jpg (9672 bytes)

 

08 (3) e.g. 1933 Fleetwood V-16 style #5508 (four built). Fleetwood had a number of surprising styling codes for bodies mounted on the 143" [3m63] wheel base V-16 chassis in 1933. However, so few of them were built (125 units, plus one "unknown" chassis) that it is not surprising that individual orders got a special style or job number unlike the standard codes.  In this case we are looking at a 2-passenger convertible coupe on the shorter 143" [3m63] wheel base for 1933. Neither this particular car nor style #5509 (2-passenger coupe) appear in the Fleetwood catalog for 1933. My hunch is that Fleetwood simply custom-finished (for a couple of wealthy clients) a Fisher-bodied 2-passenger convertible coupe (style #168) and a 2-passenger coupe (style #158), re-numbering them #5508 and #5509 respectively.

v633cv.jpg (7399 bytes)

v633-5586cust.jpg (36166 bytes)
This Fleetwood sixed coupe style for 1933 (#5586) is very similar to #5508, above it

 

08C (2) V-16 style #4108C, termed by Fleetwood an imperial Landau cabriolet, i.e. a limousine (with division glass), leather-covered top and folding roof portion over the rear seating area. This is a controversial style, to say the least.  You can read all about it in the Database section on the sixteen-cylinder Cadillac models. Only four of these cars are reported to have been built. Barring the "C" suffix, which identifies the landaulet roof, and the light-colored leather roof covering, these cars are fundamentally identical to Pennsylvania-built Fleetwood style #4155, with its vertical, split "V" windshield and matching "half-round" or "quarter moon" split instrument panel found only on these cars and on Pennsylvania-built styles #4130 and #4175. On these panels, the instruments were evenly distributed between the LH and RH sides of the board. Click here to read more about it

4108cdgx.JPG (12953 bytes)
Montage by author, based on line drawing for style #4155

    
One of  four surviving cars

 

09 (1) V-16 style #5509, a 2-passenger coupe of which only two were built. in 1933, on the 143" wheel base; this style is not illustrated in the Fleetwood catalog for 1933, perhaps because of the different wheel base [the remainder of the 1933 V-16s, with the exception of two cars with bodies by Fisher - a 2-passenger convertible coupe and a 5-passenger coupe - were built on the 149" wheel base]. As neither this particular car nor style #5508, above (a 2-passenger convertible coupe), appear in the Fleetwood catalog for 1933; my hunch, again, is that Fleetwood custom-finished, in this case, a Fisher-bodied 2-passenger coupe (style #158), and re-numbered it #5509. e.g. 1933 Fleetwood V-16 style #5508 (four built). As mentioned earlier, Fleetwood had a number of surprising styling codes for bodies mounted on the V-16 chassis in 1933. So few cars were built on the sixteen-cylinder chassis that it is not surprising that individual orders got a special style or job number unlike the standard codes.

v6335577.JPG (8735 bytes)
There is no drawing of style #5509 in the 1933 Fleetwood catalog;
my guess is that it resembled closely the above proposed style #5577

 

09 (2) La Salle style #5009 (1935), 5-passenger, 4-door sedan, 100 units.
09D Pre- and post-war styling code digits, e.g. Cadillac style #6109D sedan (1941-1942 and 1946-1947); the "D" suffix stands for De Luxe (special finish interior)
09F Cadillac style #7509F (1937), 5-passenger formal sedan

 

10 - 19

10 (1) 1927 La Salle style #3110, a special-order Fleetwood semi-custom model on the new LaSalle 303 (cost $3600); in 1927 #1810 was given to a convertible Victoria with a body by Brunn of New York
10 (2) 1928 style #8010, a semi-custom 7-passenger imperial (limousine) costing $4445 and weighing 5135 lbs. Basically the same car as style #8000 (above), but with a lowerable glass partition, stationary leather driver's seat; Stentorphone (intercom) in a pocket at RH side of rear seat. From existing photos of this car and the preceding LaSalle model, it will be seen that they had no common styling characteristic
10 (3) 1930-31 V-16 proposal, style #4210; this was called a Fleetwood inside-drive collapsible cabriolet (i.e. a convertible coupe); the designer's drawing [slightly modified - text removed] I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, shows a car much like style #4235 but with a different, less ornate belt molding and no golf bag door; unlike other V-16 designs, and like proposed style #4205, above, this one featured vertical hood louvers similar to those used on the 1929 and 1930 Fleetwood styles.

4210.jpg (8930 bytes)

 

10L Style #8010L a 7-passenger limousine on the 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; like the foregoing style #8010 but with a leather roof covering
11 (2) La Salle style #5011 (1935), a 2-door, 5-passenger sedan, 1133 units.
11 (3) 1930-31 V-16 proposal, style #4211; this was called a Fleetwood inside-drive collapsible cabriolet (i.e. a convertible coupe); the designer's drawing  [slightly modified - text removed] I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, shows a car much like style #4210, above, but with a different, ornate hood and belt molding; again there was no golf bag door; unlike other V-16 designs, and like proposed style #4205, above, this one featured vertical hood louvers similar to those used on the 1929 and 1930 Fleetwood styles, as well as the older style, bulbous tail-lights and two-bar bumpers front and rear.

4211.jpg (8882 bytes)

 

11A As above but with the ill-fated "Sunshine" roof option
12 1928 style #3512, a custom town car on 132" chassis,  with leather roof, imitation landau irons, no ¼-windows, opera type auxiliary seats. Also 1930 V-8 style #3512, again on 152" chassis, and #3912 on 140" wheel base, o.a. length 211", o.a. width = 74¾".  Style #3912 is shown in the 1930 Book of Fleetwood dated 16.9.1929, on p.37; it is known as the Fleetwick town cabriolet and has the occasional opera-type seats. In 1930-31 styling digits "12" designated a standard Fleetwood 5-passenger town car body with rear opening doors, leather-covered roof with false landau bows, two light opera-type auxiliary seats, LH seat facing right and RH seat facing the rear; it had a "V"-type solid bronze, slightly slanting windshield in fully chromium-plated finish or with a black-painted frame, chrome-plated inner frames, no ¼-windows, ventilators each side of cowl plus one on top, dome light combined with ventilator, two inner corner lights, two outside step lights for rear doors, front door windows, rear door windows and division glass all drop flush with moldings, driver's roof curtain and steel side supports carried under front seat when not in use.

       30-3912xxx.jpg (31067 bytes)     30-3912xx.JPG (29495 bytes)
Fleetwood "Fleetwick",  Job #3912, for 1929-30
Interestingly, the catalog image (left)  has a hastily penciled-in quarter window [where, in fact, there should be none];
as you can see in the lower image, right, the designer did not take the time to erase the ends of the landau irons from
another Fleetwood  style; I have made up a corrected drawing (right), to show the fully enclosed quarters that distingish this style


V-16 style #4312 was the same, but in V-16 style #4212, these parts, when not in use, were concealed in a compartment in the upper front part of the roof behind the driver's head, Fleetwood- designed chromium-plated hardware, vanity case with imported [Jaeger?] 8-day clock, Fleetwood- designed French walnut smoking case, telephone in slash pocket on RH rear quarter panel above arm rest, two carpet-covered, sprung and padded foot cushions combining foot rest and hassock features, robe strap, folding arm rest in center of rear seat back, silk curtains on all windows in rear compartment including glass division, silk umbrella [nested at RH side of division partition?], car wired for radio [radio optional at extra cost].  Style #4312 had in addition a ceiling luggage carrier (net) and a sheepskin mat in the rear compartment. V-16 style #4212 interior fittings and finish included walnut with burl inlay and ebony stripe on rear doors and division [division glass had a porthole]; combination finish panel and smoking case across the center division. Side arm rests had concealed pocket (access by raising top pad of arm rest); driver's curtain could be folded back completely and concealed in compartment in upper front part of body. There were a robe cord on the division and arm slings at rear door edges; adjustable rear seat back and cushion; clock on division header bar; 6 units of style #4212 were built. Base price of car was $6525; 24 units of style #4312 were built. This code was used again in 1933, a single car being built. Fleetwood built also a unique town car identified by styling code #4412. I have seen no photos of that car; the slightly modified line drawing [text removed] included below was acquired in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous.

4212dg.jpg (10207 bytes)     4212clo.JPG (9419 bytes)
Fleetwood town car styles with final digits "12"
had shorter bodies and no rear quarter windows
D
esigner's drawing at right shows the driver's canopy in place
 

v633-5512x.jpg (43522 bytes)
Artist's proposal for the same style on the V-16 chassis for 1933

 

12C 1930 Series 353 V-8 style #3512C designated the Fleetwick Transformable cabriolet. Style #3912C Fleetwick town Landaulet; same as style "12", above, but folding roof portion over rear seating area. Styles #4212C and #4312C were a similar factory proposal costing $750 over list for the Series 452 V-16 chassis for 1930. None were ordered or built.

4212c.JPG (9052 bytes)
Style #4212C (proposal); none were built

 

12CP Style #3512CP offered on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; as above but with plain instead of scalloped hood
12LB Style #5712LB on the 1934-35 Cadillac chassis. This code was used to differentiate between the standard town car with leather roof covering and the same car when ordered with plain metal roof (see style #5512MB, below)
12MB Style #5712MB; as above, on the 1934-35 Cadillac chassis. This code was used to differentiate between the standard town car with leather roof covering and the same car when ordered with plain metal roof (see style #5512LB, above)
12P Style #3512P offered on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; as for style #3512, above, but with plain instead of scalloped hood
13 (2) 1931 V-8 style #4813 town car with blank rear quarters and flat, raked windshield. There is a drawing of this style in the book 80 Years of Cadillac-LaSalle by Walter M.P. McCall [p.159].  It is believed that this 5-passenger town cabriolet design by Fleetwood was never actually built
13 (3) 1930-31 V-16 proposal, style #4213; this was called a Fleetwood inside-drive collapsible cabriolet (i.e. a convertible coupe); the designer's drawing [slightly modified - text removed] I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, shows a car very similar in general appearance to style #4211, above, but with a slightly different hood molding; again there was no golf bag door; unlike other V-16 designs, and like proposed style #4205, above, this one featured vertical hood louvers similar to those used on the 1929 and 1930 Fleetwood styles, as well as the older style, bulbous tail-lights and two-bar bumpers front and rear.

4213.jpg (8754 bytes)
This racy convertible coupe was never actually built

 

13 (4) Among the body styles offered in 1933 on the V-16 chassis was style #5513, a variation on the "12" town car theme. It was never built.
13 (4) Style #7513, a 7-passenger imperial sedan style (or limousine) built on the 138" wheel base V-8 chassis for 1937
13L Style #7513L. A body similar to the above style but for livery operation, i.e. a formal version of the same car with a leather roof covering
14 (1) 1930-31 V-16 proposal, style #4214; this was called a Fleetwood transformable landaulet  (i.e. a town car with collapsible rear quarters); the designer's drawing I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, shows a car very similar in general appearance to style #4264B, below [the version with canework applied to the rear body], but with functional landau bars.

4214.jpg (8945 bytes)


This is the regular Fleetwood style #4264-B

 

14 (2) 1933 V-16 proposal, style #5514; this town car was similar in layout to style #5513 (above); again, the fact that the style number is just one digits away from the standard town car style shows it to be a variation on that theme; the essential difference between this proposal and style #5513 is that this car was to feature a painted metal roof (no leather). A nice car, but none were built.
15 (1) In 1927, style #1915 was given to a 6-passenger sedan-landaulet with body by Brunn of New York; in 1928 styles #3515, a 7-passenger limousine and style #8015, a 7-passenger imperial cabriolet weighing 5135 lbs and costing $4445. Basically the same as style #8005 but with lowerable glass partition, stationary leather driver's seat and Stentorphone (intercom) in pocket at RH side of rear seat
15 (2) 1928 style #3015 was a 7-passenger limousine on 138" wheel base chassis
18 Style #7518 (1937) >>>>>
18 (1) Fleetwood V-16 proposed style #4218 was termed an "inside drive cabriolet" (i.e. a sedan with a fancy leather roof covering); unlike similar style #4208, this design had neither a divider nor any auxiliary seating; window frames appear light-colored or possibly chromed. Like style #4208, it featured the fashionable, light-colored leather top imitating Burbank, which was much in vogue in Europe. I got a designer's drawing for this style, in 2001, from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous.

4218.jpg (8567 bytes)

 

19 1935 LaSalle, style #5019, 5602 units built.
Pre- and post-war styling code digits designating a 5-passenger Sedan (e.g. V-16 style #9019, 1938-1940); this style is outwardly identical to style #9033, below.
19A As above but with ill-fated "Sunshine" roof option, e.g. 1941 60S, serial No. 6342052, body #97, sun roof, gunmetal gray, maroon roof, special Laidlaw maroon upholstery, matching carpets, maroon instrument panel and steering wheel, electric windows [NOT Hydro-Lectric]
19D Style #6219D (1941); the "D" suffix was introduced in 1941 to distinguish between standard and De Luxe models; the latter featured more luxurious interior appointments
19F V-16 style #9019F (1938-1940); a 5-passenger imperial [with division glass but without leather roof covering] (see "19", above)
19S-A  or (19SA): Style #6019S-A (1939) and #6019SA (1940) 5-passenger sedan with sunroof; 230 were built in 1940
19S-F Style #6019S-F (1940) [Schneider lists this one as #6019AF] a 5-passenger sedan with division and sunroof; 3 were built in 1940

 

20 - 29

20 (1) The 1927 Fleetwood catalog listed a La Salle imperial sedan coded #3120 and listing at $3800. In 1928 Cadillac offered style #8020, a 5-passenger sedan with metal rear and small ¼-windows. That same year the company also offered style #520, a 7-passenger town car with leather roof, imitation landau irons, small ¼-windows and forward-facing auxiliary seats.
20 (2) Fleetwood later adopted final digits "20" for a series of town cars with ¼-windows, e.g. 1928 V-8 style #3520 costing $5000, 1930 V-8 style 3520, weighing 5070 lbs and costing $5500, and #3920 costing $5145; described as the Fleetmont town cabriolet (Quarter Window) on 140" wheel base, o.a. length 211", o.a. width = 74¾". Like style #3912, this car had a "V"-type slanting windshield in fully chromium finished or black -painted frame. It had small ¼-windows and 2 forward-facing auxiliary seats upholstered over springs that were semi-concealed when folded against the front partition. There were ventilators each side of cowl plus one on top, dome light combined with roof ventilator, two inner corner lights, two outside step lights for rear doors, front door windows, rear door windows and division glass all drop flush with moldings, whereas ¼-windows drop only part of the way, driver's roof curtain and steel side supports carried under front seat when not in use [V-16 style #4320 had these parts in the roof, behind the driver's head], Fleetwood-designed chromium-plated hardware, vanity case with imported [Jaeger?] 8-day clock, Fleetwood-designed French walnut smoking case, telephone in slash pocket on RH rear quarter panel above arm rest, two carpet-covered foot cushions, robe strap, folding arm rest in center of rear seat back, silk curtains on all windows in rear compartment including glass division, silk umbrella [nested at RH side of division partition?], car wired for radio [radio optional at extra cost]. There was also a style #3920 in 1930.


Fleetwood "Fleetmont",  Job #3920, for 1929-30


V-16 styles #4220 and #4320 were described as Transformable cabriolet models, indicating a removable roof portion over the driving area and a leather covered roof; style #4220 of which 9 units were built had the plain hood, curved or mail coach sill and flat, slightly raked windshield in a body-colored frame, whereas, style #4320 (25 units built) had the scalloped hood, straight sill and "V"-type slightly raked windshield in a chromium frame; both cars featured rear opening doors The windshield was solid bronze; walnut with burl inlay and ebony inlaid stripe on rear doors, ¼-windows and division [division glass had a "porthole"]; combination finish panel and smoking case across center division. Side arm rests had concealed pocket (access by raising top pad of arm rest); driver's curtain could be folded back completely and concealed in compartment in upper front part of body. Robe cord on division and arm slings at rear door edge; adjustable rear seat back and cushion; clock on division header bar. In addition style #4320 had a luggage carrier (net) at ceiling level and a sheepskin mat in the rear compartment. This town car style remained popular and was seen again in 1933

20B [special order - unique] From the information researched by Carl L. Steig in the early seventies and compiled by Roy Schneider in his authoritative book Sixteen Cylinder Motor Cars, this was a standard 7-passenger V-16 town car, termed a Transformable town cabriolet by Fleetwood, with a painted metal rather than the standard leather-covered roof found on styles ending with digits "20". I guess the inner fittings and fixtures matched those of the standard Fleetwood style #3920/4220 described above.
20C 1930 V-8 landau style #3520C and #3920-C Fleetmont town Landaulet. The preceding description applies also to this car which, in addition, had a folding roof portion over the rear seating area. The landau roof option was offered for 1930-31 V-16 style #4320C at a cost of $800. None of this style were built.

4220c.JPG (8680 bytes)
None of these were built

 

20CP Style #3520CP offered on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; as above but with plain instead of scalloped hood
20L Style #8020L was a 5-passenger sedan on the 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; like the foregoing style #8020 but with leather roof covering
20P Style #3520P was offered on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; as for style #3520, above, but with plain instead of scalloped hood
21 1933 V-16 styling proposal #5521. A variation on the "20" theme (above) as indicated by the styling code which is just one digit higher than the standard code for this ¼-window town car, this car was offered optionally with or without leather roof covering; it featured a 1933 Fleetwood novelty for sedans and limousines: a concave-curved rear body panel with a door to storage space behind the rear seat (an early version of today's trunk). None were built
23 Pre- and post-war styling code digits designating a roomy sedan (e.g. V-16 style #9023, 1938-1940); this style is outwardly identical to style #9033, below
23L Pre- and post-war styling code digits, e.g. style #7523L (1937) 7-passenger touring sedan; a formal version of the above car with a leather roof covering, for livery operations
23S Style #7523S (1937); as for #7523 but without division glass
23SL Style #7523SL (1937); a formal version of the same car with a leather roof covering, for livery operations
24 V-16 style #5524 (1933). A variation on the "25" theme (as indicated by the styling code which is just one digit short of the standard town car code), this car featured a protruding convex rear body panel with a door to storage space behind the rear seat (an early version of today's trunk). Only one was built

v6335524.JPG (6243 bytes)
1933 Fleetwood style #5524, town car for seven passengers (only 1 unit built)

 

25 (1) In 1927, style #2925 was a town car with forward-facing auxiliary seats; in 1928, style #8025 was a 5-passenger sedan with leather roof, without landau irons and with small ¼-windows that cost $4095.
25 (2) Later, V-8 styles with final digits "25", came to identify town car styles e.g. 1928 style #3525 costing $5000 and 1930 version weighing 4980 lbs and costing $5250, and 3925 weighing 5135 lbs and costing $5145. Standard Fleetwood 7-passenger town car on 140" wheel base, o.a. length 211", o.a. width 74¾" labeled the Fleetcrest town cabriolet (formal rear quarters). Also known as a Transformable cabriolet owing to the removable portion of roof over the driver's compartment. Car had rear opening doors. Features include full leather roof, no ¼-windows, false landau bows, two extra-wide auxiliary seats without arm rests, upholstered over springs, partly concealed when folded against front partition, "V"-type slanting windshield in fully chromium finished or black-painted frame, ventilators each side of cowl plus one on top, dome light combined with roof ventilator, two inner corner lights, two outside step lights for rear doors, front door windows, rear door windows and division glass all drop flush with moldings, driver's roof curtain and steel side supports carried under front seat when not in use, Fleetwood-designed chromium-plated hardware, vanity case with imported [Jaeger?] 8-day clock, Fleetwood-designed French walnut smoking case, telephone in slash pocket on RH rear quarter panel above arm rest, two carpet-covered foot cushions, robe strap, folding arm rest in center of rear seat back, silk curtains on all windows in rear compartment including glass division, silk umbrella [nested at RH side of division partition?], car wired for radio [radio optional at extra cost].

28_3525.jpg (8605 bytes)


Fleetwood #3525 for 1928 (above)  and Fleetwood "Fleetcrest",  Job #3925 for 1929-30 (below it)


V-16 styles #4225 (6 units) and #4325 (35 units) were similarly appointed but included a chrome finished solid, bronze, "V"-type slightly slanting windshield frame; in the vanity case were included a mirror and cigarette case; walnut with burl inlay and ebony stripe on rear doors and division [division glass had a "porthole"]; combination finish panel and smoking case across center division. Side arm rests had concealed pocket (access by raising top pad of arm rest); driver's curtain could be folded back completely and concealed in compartment in upper front part of body. Robe cord on division and arm slings at rear door edge; adjustable rear seat back and cushion; clock on division header bar. In addition, style #4325 had a luggage carrier (net) at ceiling level, a silk umbrella and a sheepskin mat. Style #4225 had a base price of $8750. The style was a popular one and Cadillac used it again in 1933

4225clo.JPG (8682 bytes)
This line drawing shows the town car with the driver's canopy in place

 

25B Style #5725B on the 1934-35 Cadillac chassis. A departure from the standard "25" style of which the special feature, in this case, is not known. My guess, however, is that no leather was applied to the roof
25C 1930 V-8 style #3525C costing $5500; Style #3925-C was the Fleetcrest town landaulet; it featured the same appointments as above and had a folding roof portion over the rear seating area.
V-16 #4325C on 148" wheel base (= 376cm) designated a Fleetwood Transformable cabriolet. As above but with a folding roof portion over rear seating area.  The landau roof option was offered for V-16 style #4325 at a cost of $750. Three such units [#4325C] were built. One V-16 style #4225C also was built.

4225c.JPG (8674 bytes)
Only one of these style #4225C town landaulets was built

 

25CP Style #3525CP offered on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; as above but with plain instead of scalloped hood
25LB Style #5725LB on the 1934-35 Cadillac chassis. This code was used to differentiate between the standard town car with leather roof covering and the same car when ordered with plain metal roof (see style #5525MB, below)
25MB Style #5725MB; as above, on the 1934-35 Cadillac chassis. This code was used to differentiate between the standard town car with leather roof covering and the same car when ordered with plain metal roof (see style #5725LB, above)
25P Style #3525P offered on 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; as for style #3525, above, but with plain instead of scalloped hood
25Q 1932 V-16 style #5125Q, described as a 7-passenger town cabriolet, i.e. a town car; in this case I believe the "Q" indicates the presence of quarter (Q) windows, which were a non-standard feature of town cars identified by final digits "25"

v65125Q.JPG (6099 bytes)
This filigree image is a montage by the author, using an artist's view of
Fleetwood style 5125, to give an idea what this job might have looked like

 

26 1933 V-16 styling proposal #5526. This was a variation on the "25" theme (as indicated by the styling code which is just one digit higher than the standard town car code), this car featured a protruding concave rear body panel with a door to storage space behind the rear seat (an early version of today's trunk). None were built
27 La Salle style 5027 (1938), a 2-4 passenger coupe with fold-out opera seats behind front seats
27C La Salle style #5227C (1940) and Cadillac #6227C (1940); presumably a model with landaulet rear. Although their inclusion in the numerical list of body styles issued by Cadillac in 1948 indicates that such cars were effectively built, none appear in Roy Schneider's (or any other) listing for the year; production, if any, may have been limited to a single car of each style
27D Style #6127D (1941); the "D" suffix stood for De Luxe [more luxurious interior appointments]
29 (1) Style #5029 a 5-passenger imperial, that is a sedan with partition, on the 140" wheel base V-12 Cadillac chassis for 1932 and presumably this was a similar style to the standard 5-passenger limousine or imperial sedan style identified by final digits "30". Fleetwood sometimes used the pair of digits immediately preceding or following those for a given style, to identify a special style derived from the basic one
Style #5129, the same body on 149" wheel base V-16 chassis for 1932

V65129.jpg (4593 bytes)
My guess is that this job probably was a mild variation on style #5130

 

29 (2) Style #7029, for 1936, was described as a 5-passenger convertible touring sedan.
29 (3) Style #7529 was a convertible sedan style on the 131" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1937.
V-16 style #9029, the standard code for the convertible sedan style on second generation sixteens (1938-1940); on earlier cars most convertible sedan styles were identified by final digits "80".

V6389029.jpg (7744 bytes)
The V-16 convertible sedan, 1938-1940

 

29D Style #6229D (1941); the abbreviation "D" suggests a De Luxe version of the preceding car, that is one with more luxurious appointments

 

30 - 39

30 (1) The 1927 Fleetwood catalog included a town car identified by style #3130 costing $4500.
30 (2) The 1928 Fleetwood catalog included style #8030, a 5-passenger imperial (limousine), similar to 1928 style #8020 but with lowerable glass partition, stationary leather driver's seat and Stentorphone in pocket at RH side of rear seat. In the same catalog appears style #3130, a La Salle town car with permanently open driver's compartment flanked by extra-wide wind-wings.
30 (3) A few years after the La Salle town car, above, was given final digits "30", these came to identify 5-passenger sedan styles; e.g. V-8 style #3830, weight 5050 lbs, cost $4345; 1930 Fleetwood style #3930 Fleetdene 5-passenger imperial on 140" wheel base (= 355.5cms), o.a. length: 211" (= 536cms.), o.a. width: 74¾" (= 190cms.). Basic styling features and equipment like style #3930S (below) with following exceptions: full glass partition between driver and passenger compartments with flush channels, telephone in sash pocket RH side quarter panel, additional dome light in front compartment, two light opera seats, stationary front seat upholstered in leather or cloth as standard, no curtain on division glass, robe cord instead of robe rail; V-12 style #4830 (below)
30 (3) 1930 style #3830 and #3930 5-passenger imperial [as above] with division glass, robe cord instead of rail, V-16 style 4130 5-passenger 4-door imperial termed an Inside Drive; it had a metal roof, division glass, quarter windows, two small opera-type seats; rear opening doors and an 18°, flat, slanting windshield, that became known as a Madame X windshield, even though the first Madame X had a vertical, "V" windshield.


Fleetwood "Fleetdene",  job #3930, for 1929-30
[ the sedan version, without chauffeur division, looks exactly the same from the outside ]


Early V-16 style #4130 models built at Fleetwood PA. plant had an almost vertical "V"-type windshield, center opening doors and a split "V", quarter-moon instrument panel with half of the instruments in front of the driver and the other half in front of the front seat passenger. Of the 17 units built, only 7 were of the flat-windshield Madame X style, the other 10 having been built at the old Fleetwood plant in Pennsylvania; V-16 style #4130 had a base price of $7300. V-16 style #4330 (50 units) had the scalloped hood, straight sill, vertical windshield with stubby windshield posts and center opening doors; it was like style #4130 in its interior appointments, except for an "X"-type partition between front and rear compartments, i.e. without header bar, so that a sedan effect was obtained when the glass partition was lowered. There was also a telephone in a slash pocket on the RH ¼-panel; the front seat was stationary and finished in leather or cloth trim. This car had two opera seats in the rear compartment (LH facing right, RH facing rear) There was also an additional dome light in the front compartment. Interior finish panels were walnut with burl inlay and ebony inlaid stripe on all doors, ¼-windows, partition and instrument panel. The robe rail was replaced by a robe cord and there was no silk curtain on the glass division. A silk umbrella was nested on the RH side of the partition.

4130V.jpg (8938 bytes)
This is the Pennsylvania built Madame X style

 

30C V-8 style #3930C designated the Fleetmere imperial; description as for style #4130, above, but with opening roof portion over rear seating area. The landau roof option was available on V-16 styles #4330 (for an extra $800) and #4330S (for $750). None were built.
30FL 1933 V-16 style #5530FL of which only one unit was built; this car is described as a 5-passenger imperial cabriolet (a limousine); it featured a partition without header or side bars, a pair of auxiliary seats and a roof covering of English leather with imitation landau irons.

 
Only one was built; it was bought  by the Vanderbilt family

 

30FL Style #5730FL on the 1934-35 Cadillac chassis. A combination of the two Fleetwood letter suffixes "F", for "formal", and "L", for "leather". Presumably this was a formal version of style "30", with blanked out rear quarters and a leather roof covering, as generally applied to a formal car like this one. The suffix "FL" was used to differentiate between the formal car with leather back and the more unusual version with plain metal back (see style #5730FM, below)
30FM Style #5730FM on the 1934-35 Cadillac chassis. A combination of the two Fleetwood letter suffixes "F", for "formal", and "M", for "Metal". Presumably this was a formal version of style "30", with blanked out rear quarters, but without the usual leather covering that would be generally applied to a formal car like this one, The suffix "FM" was used to differentiate between the formal car with metal back and the more usual version with leather back (see style #5730FL, above).
30L Style #8030L a 5-7-passenger limousine on the 140" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1928; like style #8030, above, but with leather roof covering. In 1929, style #3830L was a 5-passenger limousine with leather back.
30S(1) 1930 style #3930S Fleetdene 5-passenger sedan weighed 5135 lbs and cost $4195 ; on 140" wheel base. (= 355.5cms.) o.a. length: 211" (= 536cms.), o.a. width: 74¾" (= 190cms.). Basic styling features and equipment are painted metal rear quarters, ¼-windows, adjustable front seat, Fisher "VV" windshield, ventilators on two sides of cowl, combined dome light and ventilator, two inner corner lights, two outer step lights, all door windows drop flush with moldings, rear ¼-windows drop only part way, vanity case with 8-day imported clock [Jaeger?], French walnut smoking case, carpet-covered foot cushions, robe rail, center folding arm rest in rear seat back, silk curtains on all windows in rear compartment, Fleetwood-designed chromium-plated hardware, car wired for radio [radio optional at extra cost].


Fleetwood "Fleetdene", job #3930S, for 1929-30
[ artist's drawing is actually the limousine version, #3930 ]

 

30S(2) 1930 styles #3830S 5-passenger sedan with metal back and rear quarter panels; also #3930S
V-16 style #4130S (like #4130, above, but no division glass or opera seats), 5-passenger sedan weight 4950 lbs, cost $4195. Early production models built at Fleetwood PA. plant had almost vertical "VV"-type windshield, center opening doors and a split "V" instrument panel; 10 of these were built; the balance, i.e. 39 units in all had the flat, 18° slanting windshield common to Detroit-built V-16s. The cheaper style #4330S (394 units) was similar to V-8 style #3930S It had an adjustable front seat finished in cloth trim. Interior finish panels were walnut with burl inlay and ebony inlaid stripe on all doors, ¼-windows, and instrument panel. rear seat back and seat cushion were adjustable; hood, sill, windshield and door configuration were as for style #4330.
30SC V-8 style #3830SC; like styles with final digits "30S" but with opening roof portion over rear seating area [landau or landaulet].
30SL 1929 V-8 style #3830SL; like style with final digits "30L" but without a limousine partition.
30SFL This was a 1933 V-16 proposal; it was not built; similar in appearance to style 30FL, the interior was not fitted with a partition.
31 V-16 style #5531 (1933); best described as the Madame X version of style #5530, this style featured angular lines and raked windshield. Like style #5555, below, it enjoyed the Madame X designation.

v6335531.JPG (5665 bytes)
Style #5531, Madame X limousine for five passengers (3 units built)

31S V-16 style #5531S (1933); this car was similar in outward appearance to the preceding car. The partition was eliminated, making it a sedan. It too enjoyed the Madame X label.
32 e.g. 1933 V-16 styling proposal #5532; just two digits up from the standard styling code for 5-passenger limousines ("30"), this was to be a variation on the same theme, with the new concave-curved rear body panel masking a small trunk area. None were built.
32S 1933 V-16 styling proposal #5532S; like the preceding car the style code is just two digits up from the standard styling code for 5-passenger sedans ("30S"), indicating a variation on that theme; none were built.
33 (1) In 1928, Fleetwood built style #3133, a 5-passenger all-weather touring car.
33 (2) V-16 5-passenger style #5533 proposed by Fleetwood for 1933 but never built. Described as a 5-passenger town imperial, the car was to feature a partition without header bar or side posts. In fact, only the sedan version (next entry) was produced that year.

v633-5533.jpg (44131 bytes)

 

33 (3) Pre- and post-war styling code digits designating a roomy 7-passenger limousine with division glass.

V-16 style #9033 was current from 1938 through 1940

V6389033.jpg (7799 bytes)
Outwardly, this style is identical to styles #9019, #9019F and #9023 (above)

 

33F V-16 style #9033F (1938-1940), 7-passenger formal sedan [with division glass] and blank rear quarters.

V638903f.jpg (7376 bytes)

 

33FLB Style #7233FLB (1940) >>>>>; this car appears in the numerical list of body styles issued by Cadillac in 1948; it is featured in Roy Schneider's list for 1940 as style #7233F (without the LB suffix indicating the leather roof covering); twenty were built in 1940.
33L Pre- and post-war styling code digits designating a roomy 7-passenger limousine with division glass. The L indicates a "leather" roof covering, e.g. 1941 style #7533L.
33S 1933 V-16 style #5533S, a 5-passenger town sedan fitted with a standard Cadillac trunk. Six units were built that year.

v6335533.JPG (7227 bytes)
1933 Fleetwood style #5533S, sedan for five passengers

 

33SL Style #7533SL (1937). My guess is that this was an exception to the rule that style "33" had to have a division glass. The "S" suffix would seem to indicate a sedan (no division) and the "L" a car used for livery service.
35 (1) In the 1928 Fleetwood marketed a 5-passenger imperial cabriolet style #8035 similar to 1928 style #8025 but with lowerable glass partition, stationary leather driver's seat and Stentorphone in pocket at RH side of rear seat. In the same year was reportedly built style #3135, described as a special town cabriolet (town car?); mo details available
35 (2) In 1928 Fleetwood used these digits in style #3435 which was a special town car built on the 152" wheel base chassis.
35 (3) Fleetwood's V8 2-passenger convertible coupe for 1931 carried style number #4535 (line drawing here). The same body style on the V-12 chassis carried style number #4735.


Apart from the foregoing exceptions, final digits "35" later were used to identify the convertible coupe style enjoying the Fleetwood appellation Inside drive Collapsible cabriolet, better known as a convertible coupe; e.g. 1930-31 V-16 style #4335 [price $5900 - 100 units built] is described in an early photo album of V-16 styles {seen in ZTV collection***} as having a "V"-type, swing-out windshield in a polished Duralium finished frame. There were three engine compartment ventilators: one on either side and one on top of cowl. A light in the rear compartment (under the rumble seat) was controlled by a switch on the golf compartment door; windows dropped flush with moldings, only the seat cushion was adjustable. There were flush type ash-receivers as well as decorative finish panels on both doors Rumble-seat cover panel was operated from inside car by a remote handle. Car was wired for radio, which was optional at extra cost, and there was a cover for the convertible top when folded down. This model was built in the Fleetwood plant in PA., and was no longer offered for sale in the second V-16 price list dated 15 October 1930. An artist's drawing of this style shows straight sill and special belt design at top of door, although the actual car had a mail coach sill and different belt molding at door level. Base price was $6900. V-16 style #4235 (94 units) had a curved or mail coach sill. Later convertible coupe style were identified by final digits "67". There was a proposal in the 1933 Fleetwood program for a 2-passenger convertible coupe style #5535; none were built.

4235op.JPG (8323 bytes)
Fleetwood style #4235, with top down; dip in the belt molding, behind the rear mounted hinges, 
was intended to allow the folded top to lie flush with the belt and with the rear body;
the designer has exaggerated that fact; the folded top does rise above the rear body

 

36 In 1927, style #1836 was given to a 4-passenger club sedan with a body by Brunn of New York
36 (just one digit higher than regular convertible coupe style "35") this was another proposal included in the 1933 Fleetwood range. In fact, none were built.
37 [possibly an error ???] In a Dutch literature item for 1931 I saw a LaSalle open touring car with body by Fleetwood, with style number 4637; it was probably a typing mistake, because the Fleetwood final digits for the open touring car were "57", not "37".
"38" Style #3238 built in 1928 was a 5-passenger club cabriolet (a close-coupled sedan with leather roof covering).
"39" (1) Styles #7539 (V-8) and #8539 (V-12) were also featured in 1937

V-16 style #9039 (1938-1940), was a 5-passenger town sedan [for the second generation sixteens, final digits "39" replaced former final digits "61S"].

V6389039.jpg (8205 bytes)

 

39 (2) Post-war styling code digits designating a sedan style, e.g. style 6239 (1958).

  

40 - 49

40 V-16 style #5540 (1933); a car similar in appearance to style #5530FL, it too was described as a 5-passenger imperial cabriolet; it had more rounded lines and featured the new built-in trunk behind a convex-curved rear body panel. Only 2 were built.

v6335540.JPG (7446 bytes) 
1933 Fleetwood style #5540, limousine for five passengers

 

40B Unique (???) style #5140B on the 149" wheel base V-16 Cadillac chassis for 1932. This car, a special imperial sedan for 5 passengers with cloth top also featured a partition as well as opera seats [I have also seen it reported that this was a special 5-passenger Sedan built on the Cadillac V-12 chassis].

v65140B.JPG (4670 bytes)
Montage of style #5140B,  using the artist's rendering of style #5131

    v632Indianapolis.jpg (13113 bytes)
Survivor photographed at the Indianapolis motor speedway

 

40S V-16 style #5540S (1933); a similar style to 1933 style #5540 except that the partition was eliminated, making the car a sedan. Two units were built.

v6335540.JPG (7057 bytes)
1933 Fleetwood style #5540S, sedan for five passengers

 

43 (1) Styles #7543 and #8543 both were town car models in 1937, the first on the V-8 chassis the other on the V-12
43 (2) 1930 Fleetwood design #4243 s-passenger phaeton for 452 series V-16 [not built]; design shows dipped belt at each of four rear-opening doors, a special "V" windshield, rear trunk and correct "42" series curved or "mail coach" sill

4243.jpg (5564 bytes)

 

44 (1) 1928 was a prolific year for Fleetwood; style #3144 was a 4-passenger sedan on a short 132" wheel base chassis.
44 (2) 1930 Fleetwood design #4244 special phaeton for 452 series V-16 [not built]; design shows dipped belt at each of four front-opening doors, flat windshield, rear trunk and correct

4244.jpg (6334 bytes)

 

45 In 1928 there was a style #8045 termed a 5-passenger sedan cabriolet with leather roof, imitation landau irons, no ¼-windows. The code was used again in 1933 for a similar body type that was proposed but never built; described as a 5-passenger imperial cabriolet, it was to feature a partition without cross bar or side pieces, 2 opera seats and three large, exposed, chrome-plated hinges. In early 1997 one of my knowledgeable correspondents viewed some original Fleetwood art work including a 1935 styling proposal #5545 for the V-16.  However, I don't believe this style was ever built. Final digits "45" for this body style soon were replaced with final digits "55S".
45C Style 8045 but with folding quarters over rear seat passengers.
45S Another 1933 proposal for the V-16 that was never built, this car was to be similar to style "45" with the partition removed, making it a 5-passenger sedan.
46 1930 design #4246 7-passenger touring car for the 452 series V-16 [not built]; design shows straight belt line curving up over front cowl, front-opening doors, flat windshield, inward sweeping rear body, no trunk and straight sill instead of "42" series curved or "mail coach" sill.

4246.jpg (5325 bytes)

 

48 1930 design proposal #4248 was termed a sport phaeton; the designer's drawing I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, shows an open phaeton style with a convex curved trunk area and raised (?) curved body panel sweeping from near the windshield back and down to the rear fender; despite initial digits "42", usually indicating a curved sill, this design has the straight sill of the "43" series designs.

4248.jpg (8423 bytes)

 

 

50 - 59

50 1927 style #2950 and 1930 V-8 style #3550 [3-position all-weather phaeton or convertible sedan, McC, pp.132-33; weight 5070 lbs, cost $5500; #4150 [special - it was in Fleetwood’s Standard Catalog of Cadillac but was it ever built? Termed by Fleetwood a fully collapsible town cabriolet, it had a scalloped hood, rear opening doors, functional landau bars. Style #3350 shown in the 1930 Standard Catalog of Cadillac was built on a long chassis (152"). Style #3550 was similar; six of these were built; all had RH drive and all were shipped to Argentina. Another style, #3950, was also available in 1930; it was labeled as a town car with fully collapsible top. I have seen a line drawing of a similar body style on a V8 chassis (below). In the 1931 Cadillac listing is a Fleetwood 7-passenger transformable town cabriolet (town car) on the V-12  chassis with style number #4750.

   

30-4150b.jpg (25639 bytes)    30-4150c.jpg (23752 bytes)
Fleetwood job #4150, for 1929-30

   
Note the position of the front door handles (doors hinged at the front)


Fleetwood Style #4150, for 1931

 

50C Style #3550C, like the foregoing style #3550 but presumably with fixed roof over the chauffeur compartment; otherwise fully collapsible from the division back.
50X [exception] 1931 Fleetwood job #2950X. According to Carl Steig [Roy Schneider book Sixteen Cylinder Motor Cars], the presence of the suffix or prefix "LX" in styling codes of the twenties and thirties  was usually an indication of a special order number in factory documents, in lieu of an established Fisher/Fleetwood job/style code. This car is described in factory documents as a 7-passenger special sedan. Only one was built. It is unfortunate that there seems to be no photographic record of this car which I assume was basically a standard Fleetwood 7-passenger sedan in the "43..." group, with perhaps more luxurious appointments, in keeping with the car's superb 16-cylinder engine; it may have been used by a senior Cadillac or GM official. As with other special jobs with an "X" or "LX" prefix or suffix, presumably indicating the special order, I believe this numerical combination is to be read as one complete numeral, i.e. "2950", making it the 2950th full custom built by Fisher/Fleetwood 
51 In the 1927 and 1928 Fleetwood catalogs were illustrated a La Salle transformable cabriolet (town car) style #3051 listing at $4700; there were also two La Salle town car styles: #3351 (1930) and #3751 (1928). The same style numbers were used again in the 1929 La Salle catalogue for the same bodies. There was a Fleetwood town car proposal #4151  (illustrated below) that would have looked good on the V-16 chassis ...had it been built!

v6drg_4151.jpg (6979 bytes)
This one was never built

 

51C In the 1931 Master Parts List for July, a 1929 Cadillac style #3751C is shown as having been built on the 134" wheel base chassis; that car is described as a   Transformable Town Sedan with collapsible rear quarters
52 Here is a drawing of Fleetwood proposal #4252 for what looks like a sporty, boat-tail roadster; to my knowledge, it was never built; the initial digits "42" suggest it may have been intended for the V-16 chassis with coach sill, as seen here.

v6drg4252.jpg (7244 bytes)

 

53 V-16 style #9053 (1938-1940), 7-passenger town car; although there is no direct relationship with the majority of styling codes used by Fleetwood for 2nd-generation sixteens, these two final; digits could be said to replace final digits "25" used to identify a 7-passenger town car with blank rear quarters.

V6389053.jpg (7784 bytes)

 

53LB Style #6053LB (1940); it is assumed the "LB" suffix was added to differentiate between these and other town cars built the same year that had a plain metal roof instead of the usual leather covering applied to formal town cars [see "53MB", below]. Six of the "LB" version were built in 1940.
53MB Style #6053MB (1940); the "MB" suffix merely indicates a plain metal roof in lieu of the standard leather covering usually applied to town cars [see also "53LB", above]. Nine of the plain, "MB" versions were built in 1940.
53S Style #6053S (1940); this number is included in the numerical list of body styles issued by Cadillac in 1948; I assume we are dealing with a special town car built without a division.
55 1928 V-8 style #8055, a 5-passenger imperial cabriolet (limousine) similar to 1928 style #8045 but with lowerable glass division, stationary leather driver's seat and Stentorphone (intercom) in pocket at RH side of rear seat; it cost $4245; also 1930 style #3855, 5-passenger imperial, with full leather back and rear ¼-panels, weight 4920 lbs, cost $4195; 4-door sedan termed an Inside drive cabriolet, no ¼- windows, false landau bows, two small opera-type seats; center opening doors on model with vertical "VV"-type windshield; style #3955 designated the Fleetmere imperial cabriolet, a 5-passenger imperial cabriolet, o.a. length 211" (= 536cms.), o.a. width 74¾" (= 190cms); the design is the same as style #3955S, below, with the following exceptions: full glass partition with flush channels between front and rear compartments, lowering fully, telephone in slash pocket on RH quarter panel above armrest, additional dome light in front compartment, two small opera seats (LH facing right, RH facing rear), stationary front seat upholstered in leather or cloth as standard, robe cord instead of robe rail, no curtain on division window, rear opening doors on model with 18° flat, slanting windshield (Madame X style).


Fleetwood "Fleetmere", job #3955, for 1929-30
[ the sedan version, without chauffeur division, looks exactly the same from the outside ]


V-16 style #4155 was appointed like V-8 style and used the same style number; 10 of these were built, the earliest ones being assembled at the Fleetwood plant in Pennsylvania; these had almost vertical "VV" windshields and a split "quarter-moon" instrument panel with half the instrument in front of the driver and the other half in front of the front seat passengers (LH line drawing); the majority were built at the new Fleetwood premises in Detroit; these had the 18° flat, slanting windshield and were given the Madame X name, although the "V" windshield version is also recognized as such (RH line drawing). Appointments and fittings of V-16 style #4355 [price $6350 - 52 units] were as above, with an additional dome light in the front compartment; interior finish was walnut with burl inlay and ebony inlaid stripe on all doors, division and instrument panel. A silk umbrella was nested on the far RH side of the division partition. The code was used again in 1933, two cars being built and enjoying the Madame X designation.

4155V.jpg (8550 bytes)        4355dg.jpg (8891 bytes)
(Left) This is the Pennsylvania built Madame X style with "VV" windshield
(Center) The Detroit built Madame X style with flat, slanting  windshield

(Right) The cheaper, Detroit built style #4355

 

55C 1930 style #3955C, The Fleetmere Cadillac with Collapsible Rear Quarter. No styling description given but I assume fixtures and fittings were as for Fleetwood style #3955, #4155 and #4355 except for the landaulet type opening roof portion over rear seating area (as illustrated in the Book of Fleetwood) and costing $750 extra; therefore, the list price of V-16 style #4355C, of which one unit was built, would be some $7100. All five V-16 styles #4155C were built in Detroit and consequently feature the 18° flat, slanting windshield [for more details on this style, see also style #4108C, above]. The landau roof option was available also on V-16 style #4355 for an extra $750. Only one was built (style #4355C). The style appeared again in 1933, one unit being built. That car too enjoys the Madame X  label.


Fleetwood "Fleetmere", Job #3955-C, for 1929-30

 

55S It could be said that this style number replaced earlier Fleetwood styles ending with digits "45" [see above], e.g. V-8 styles #3855S weight 4920 lbs, cost $ 4195, #1930 V-8 style #3855S, 5-passenger sedan cabriolet, as above but no glass division or 'phone, has adjustable front seat, rail instead of cord; #3955S is the Fleetmere 5-passenger sedan cabriolet, o.a. length 211" (= 536cms.), o.a. width 74¾" (= 190cms) it has full leather rear quarters with false landau bows, no ¼-windows, adjustable front seat, Fisher "VV" windshield, ventilators each side of cowl, central dome light combined with roof ventilator, two inside corner lights, two outside step lights for rear doors, all door windows drop flush with moldings, Fleetwood designed, chrome plated hardware, vanity case with imported [Jaeger?] 8-day clock, Fleetwood designed French walnut smoking case, carpet-covered foot cushions, bar type robe rail, folding armrest center of rear seat, silk curtains all windows of rear compartment, car wired for radio [radio optional at extra cost].


V-16 style #4355S [price $6125 - 81 units] was like above V-8 styles with front seat was finished in cloth trim; in the vanity case were two ash trays, a mirror and a cigarette case; in the smoking case were two further ash trays and a cigar lighter. Interior finish was walnut with burl inlay and ebony inlaid stripe on all doors and instrument panel. Concealed pocket in rear arm rests with access by raising arm rest top pad; rear seat cushion and seat back were adjustable individually. Further V-16 style #4155S [price $7125 - 7 units] was similar to style #4355S except that it had the straight sill and plain hood. Records show that this style was built with the vertical "VV" and the flat 18° slanting windshield and split, "quarter-moon" instrument panel showing that a few early editions were built at the old Fleetwood plant in Pennsylvania; starting in April 1930 this style was built in Detroit; the later models in the series enjoyed full-fledged Madame X status, although the "V" windshield styles also are entitled to the name; the car had rear opening doors.

30-3955Fmere.jpg (69322 bytes)      4355dg.jpg (8891 bytes)
Fleetwood "Fleetmere", Job #3955-S, for 1929-30
[ the limousine version is actually shown (left) ]

 

55SC 1930 V-8 style #3855SC, 5-passenger Landaulet sedan; as above but with folding roof portion over rear seating area. Style #3955-SC, the Fleetmere sedan landaulet, was as above but had a folding roof portion over the rear seating area.
The V-16 version, style 4155SC, is a rare car, only two having been built; like style #4155C they were built in Detroit and enjoy full-fledged Madame X status. The landau option was available on the V-16 as style #4355SC; none were built.
56A Style #4556A and 4856A on 143" wheel base V-12  Cadillac chassis for 1931; it was described as an 8-passenger imperial sedan, that is a roomy limousine. Being close to style No. "55", I think this may have been a stretch job on the latter style. Style #5056 on the 140" wheel base V-12  Cadillac chassis for 1932 is a 5-passenger imperial cabriolet, that is a formal sedan with partition, blank rear quarters and leather-covered roof. As already mentioned, Fleetwood sometimes used the digit pair before or after a standard digit pair to identify a special order car closely resembling a standard body style.
57 (1) 1930 style #4157 was a 7-passenger touring car with plain hood, horizontal belt molding, front-folding windshield, front opening doors and auxiliary seating in the rear compartment. A designer's drawing exists; a photo of the La Salle Fleetlands style #4057, a 7-passenger touring car on LaSalle chassis, appears in McC (Walter M.P. McCall's authoritative book 80 Years of Cadillac and LaSalle) on p.141; no styling code is given in the caption; in addition,so far as I could tell, no style #4057 is recorded in the MPL.  It was offered on the V-8 chassis as style #4557 and the V-12 as style #4657.   The La Salle was style #4057 in 1931. A similar "tourer" style was proposed by Fleetwood also for the 1933 V-16 chassis but it was never built. On the other hand, a V-8 tourer with style #5357 survives; the latter is effectively included in the "Master Parts List" for July 1st, 1933 where it is listed as having been effectively built on the 140" WB chassis in Cadillac Series 355C  (V-8); this may have been a custom design for the 1933 NY auto show, although that has not been ascertained in fact.

    

    
Fleetwood "Fleetlands", Job #4057 on LaSalle chassis,  for 1929-30


1931 Fleetwood style 4557 (on V8 chassis)

 

57 (2) Pre- and post-war body style digits. Starting in 1936 final digits "57" came to identify a 2-passenger coupe, e.g. 1937 style #7057 [Series 70, Fleetwood 2-passenger Sport coupe].
57 (3) Style #4257 (illustrated below) was a proposal for the V-16 chassis; it was never built, although a few variations on the theme were. 1930 design proposal #4257 was termed a touring car; the designer's drawing (lower left)  I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, shows a spacious, open tourer with auxiliary seating and twin spares mounted in the rear; it features a very special belt and body molding, atypical of any other Fleetwood designs of the time.

     v6-4257Cust.jpg (40521 bytes)

4257.jpg (8983 bytes)
Line drawing and artist's proposal for a Fleetwood style #4257 touring car

 

57A (1)
Style 5457A was a body mounted on the V-12   chassis, but I have not seen any photos of this car (was it ever built?  Did it look like the car below?) 
Research in factory archives by long-standing CLC member, Carl Steig, revealed that Fleetwood had built some unique styles on the V-16 chassis.  This one, style #4257A, built in 1930-31, is described in the Master Parts List (MPL) as a 5-passenger touring car with tonneau windshield.  Looking at other Fleetwood creations of the time, it would have been more appropriately described, in my opinion, as a sport phaeton.  Indeed, it has the broad, folding cowl with equally folding secondary windshield to protect rear seat passengers.  These were easy ID features on Fleetwood-built sport phaetons in 1928 and 1929, for example. 

4257A2.JPG (9973 bytes)

It is most unusual that Fleetwood should have built a car with this design code that differed radically from the original designer's drawing (next entry). The original design features center-hinged doors, no secondary cowl, a regular rear body curve rather than the concave trunk area of the car that was actually built, and the curved sill that is typical of styles with initial digits "42". As may be seen in the preceding photos, the car has front opening doors and a regular, straight sill, typical of cars with initial digits "43". Applying Fleetwood logic, and looking at the design in the next entry, this car should have had the gracefully curved coach sill.

57A (2) 1930 design proposal #4257A was termed a touring car; the designer's drawing I got in 2001 from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous, shows a spacious, open tourer with auxiliary seating with twin sidemounts.

4257a.JPG (8103 bytes)

 

57B (1) These final digits bear no relationship with above digits "57A".  V-16 style #9057B was built from 1938 to 1940;  in this case, the final digits "57B" identify a 5-passenger coupe with a narrow bench seat in the rear for 3 occasional passengers.

57H

Mr. Steig also determined that Fleetwood built this unique open car of epic proportions on the V-16 chassis for 1930-31.  It is described in the Master Parts List (MPL) as a touring car for seven passengers; it had a folding rear windshield as well as large wind wings; side curtains afforded protection of occupants in inclement weather.  I was fortunate to get the designer's drawing for this style, in 2001, from fellow CLC member and V-16 enthusiast, Craig Watrous; unlike the car that was actually built [photo to come], the drawing shows a spacious, open tourer with auxiliary seating and a special, "twin armchair" front seat.

4257h.JPG (7527 bytes)

4257h1.jpg (5220 bytes)

 

57H4
The first recorded use of the suffix "H" was in 1930 (see style #4257H, above).  It was an indication of a change in the standard roof height. Style #5457H4 is recorded as having been built on (or merely proposed for) the V-12  chassis; the roof of this car probably was heightened by 4 inches. The suffixes "H2" and "H3" also appear in the MPL and indicate a roof height increase of 2 and 3 inches respectively.
58 1933 Fleetwood V-16 proposal (never built), style #5558 (two digits short of the regular "60" phaeton style) was a special 5-passenger phaeton; the top was exposed when folded, like the Fleetwood touring car style "57".
59 (1) Style #5759 on the 146" wheel base V-8 Cadillac chassis for 1934-35;
1933 Fleetwood V-16 style #5559 (one digit short of the regular "60" phaeton style), this was a unique Fleetwood offering: a sport phaeton with a concealed top and recessed molding running from radiator to rear ¼-panel.

5559c.jpg (11895 bytes)

 

59 (2) V-16 style #9059 (1938-1940), 5-passenger Formal sedan [with division glass].

V6389059.jpg (7475 bytes)
This style is outwardly similar to style #9033F

 

59FLB Style #7259FLB (1940) is a formal sedan with a leather roof covering; this car appears on Roy Schneider's listing as style #7259; it is described more simply as a 5-passenger formal sedan with division; eighteen of them were built in 1940.

 

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or go back to the Styling index page
or view a summary of the Fisher styling codes

 

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